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This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

Next America has compiled this list of stories about early-childhood education that may affect the way you view parenting in 2015.

The Myth of Universal Childcare

A toddler rides a bike at a playgroup for preschool-aged children. (Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

Georgia's Fight to End the Childhood Word Gap

One-year-old Airon Pate, on right, and his brother Aiden, 4, play in the waiting room of a federally subsidized clinic for low-income women and children in Macon, Georgia. (Emily DeRuy)

R.I.P. Traditional American Family

The American family is no longer like Leave It to Beaver. (National Journal)

Does Your Child Have a Future in Computer Science?

Is your son or daughter a budding programmer? (Bernhard Schwarz/Flickr)

Children Who Tell Stories May Become Strong Readers

A new study suggests that African-American toddlers who are strong storytellers turn into strong readers.  (National Journal)

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

This story is part of our Next America: Early Childhood project, which is supported by grants from the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Heising-Simons Foundation.

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