Parker Knight/Flickr

Next America has compiled this list of stories about early-childhood education that may affect the way you view parenting in 2015.

The Myth of Universal Childcare

A toddler rides a bike at a playgroup for preschool-aged children. (Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

Georgia's Fight to End the Childhood Word Gap

One-year-old Airon Pate, on right, and his brother Aiden, 4, play in the waiting room of a federally subsidized clinic for low-income women and children in Macon, Georgia. (Emily DeRuy)

R.I.P. Traditional American Family

The American family is no longer like Leave It to Beaver. (National Journal)

Does Your Child Have a Future in Computer Science?

Is your son or daughter a budding programmer? (Bernhard Schwarz/Flickr)

Children Who Tell Stories May Become Strong Readers

A new study suggests that African-American toddlers who are strong storytellers turn into strong readers.  (National Journal)

This story is part of our Next America: Early Childhood project, which is supported by grants from the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Heising-Simons Foundation.

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