US President Barack Obama shakes hands with NAACP chairman Julian Bond (L) during the NAACP 100th Anniversary convention in New York.National Journal

Julian Bond—civil-rights activist, founder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and one-time member of the Georgia General Assembly—died on Aug. 16.

Bond, who also served as the longtime chairman of the NAACP, was a champion of equal rights for all Americans.

Tributes to Bond poured from institutions and leaders across the nation.

In a statement, President Obama said, "Julian Bond helped change this country for the better. And what better way to be remembered than that."

Here are some of Julian Bond's words:

On Education:

"I tell young people to prepare themselves as best they can for a world that grows more challenging every day—get the best education they can, and couple that education with real-life experience in social-justice work."

On Equality:

"The humanity of all Americans is diminished when any group is denied rights granted to others."

"We must choose love over doctrine, and when we do that, we will truly overcome."

+Julian Bond (NASA/GSFC/Pat Izzo/ Flicker Creative Commons)

"It just makes sense to me that rights are rights. These are just plain rights," he said. "There are no black rights or gay rights or women's rights; they're just rights, and everyone has them."

On Same-Sex Marriage:

"If your Bible tells you that gay people ought not be married in your church, don't tell them they can't be married at City Hall. Marriage is a civil rite as well a civil right, and we can't let religious bigotry close the door to justice to anyone."

On Economic Empowerment:

"Economic empowerment is a civil-rights issue, too. African-American consumers want fairness in the marketplace just as they do in all aspects of their lives."

+Bond looks at a portrait of himself taken by Richard Avedon in 2004 during a press preview at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. (KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

On his greatest triumph in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC):

"Our greatest triumph was that we existed at all, that these young people of college age, some of high school age, a couple a little older, put together an organization against the advice of our elders, dropped out of college, many of us—against the advice of our parents—created an organization that dared to go into the rural South, where resistance to racial justice was greatest."

On Women's Rights:

"Well, I think you could not be in the civil-rights movement without having an appreciation for everybody's rights. That these rights are not divisible—not something men have and women don't and so on. And I think working in a situation with men and women, and seeing women take on roles equal to the roles taken by men made you understand that, 'Hey, these people can do things too.' And I think it made me and other people in the movement realize that we're living in a community of equals."

On the Civil-Rights Movement:

"The civil-rights movement didn't begin in Montgomery and it didn't end in the 1960s. It continues on to this very minute."

On Education:

"I tell young people to prepare themselves as best they can for a world that grows more challenging every day—get the best education they can, and couple that education with real-life experience in social-justice work."

On Equality:

"The humanity of all Americans is diminished when any group is denied rights granted to others."

"We must choose love over doctrine, and when we do that, we will truly overcome."

+Julian Bond (NASA/GSFC/Pat Izzo/ Flicker Creative Commons)

"It just makes sense to me that rights are rights. These are just plain rights," he said. "There are no black rights or gay rights or women's rights; they're just rights, and everyone has them."

On Same-Sex Marriage:

"If your Bible tells you that gay people ought not be married in your church, don't tell them they can't be married at City Hall. Marriage is a civil rite as well a civil right, and we can't let religious bigotry close the door to justice to anyone."

On Economic Empowerment:

"Economic empowerment is a civil-rights issue, too. African-American consumers want fairness in the marketplace just as they do in all aspects of their lives."

+Bond looks at a portrait of himself taken by Richard Avedon in 2004 during a press preview at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. (KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

On his greatest triumph in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC):

"Our greatest triumph was that we existed at all, that these young people of college age, some of high school age, a couple a little older, put together an organization against the advice of our elders, dropped out of college, many of us—against the advice of our parents—created an organization that dared to go into the rural South, where resistance to racial justice was greatest."

On Women's Rights:

"Well, I think you could not be in the civil-rights movement without having an appreciation for everybody's rights. That these rights are not divisible—not something men have and women don't and so on. And I think working in a situation with men and women, and seeing women take on roles equal to the roles taken by men made you understand that, 'Hey, these people can do things too.' And I think it made me and other people in the movement realize that we're living in a community of equals."

On the Civil-Rights Movement:

"The civil-rights movement didn't begin in Montgomery and it didn't end in the 1960s. It continues on to this very minute."

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