National Journal

What It's Like to Be a Black Cop in St. Louis County

"I hope that this city — little by little — can learn and grow and that we start to value black men," he says. "It's going to take a lot of healing." — Martise Scott, police officer

"We Could Have Buried Two Police Officers Over This"


St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar speaks to the media during a press conference in Clayton, Missouri, March 12, 2015. (Michael B. Thomas/AFP/Getty Images)   

"This is beginning at times to be very difficult for any law-enforcement agency anywhere to really wrap their arms around," Belmar said. "I want everybody here to understand how difficult this is to do it the exact perfect way. It's very tough."
How Police Are Keeping Journalist From Doing Their Jobs in Ferguson


Police surround and detain two people in a car in Ferguson, Missouri. Ferguson experienced unrest after following the shooting death of teenager Michael Brown, who was shot and killed by a Ferguson police officer. (Scott Olson/Getty Images) 

"You generally have the right to view police as they do any of their official duties in public," he said. However, journalists cannot impede their efforts to perform these duties, he adds. — John Watson, a lawyer and a media law professor at American University in Washington.

What It's Like to Be a Black Cop in St. Louis County

"I hope that this city — little by little — can learn and grow and that we start to value black men," he says. "It's going to take a lot of healing." — Martise Scott, police officer

"We Could Have Buried Two Police Officers Over This"


St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar speaks to the media during a press conference in Clayton, Missouri, March 12, 2015. (Michael B. Thomas/AFP/Getty Images)   

"This is beginning at times to be very difficult for any law-enforcement agency anywhere to really wrap their arms around," Belmar said. "I want everybody here to understand how difficult this is to do it the exact perfect way. It's very tough."

How Police Are Keeping Journalist From Doing Their Jobs in Ferguson

Police surround and detain two people in a car in Ferguson, Missouri. Ferguson experienced unrest after following the shooting death of teenager Michael Brown, who was shot and killed by a Ferguson police officer. (Scott Olson/Getty Images) 

"You generally have the right to view police as they do any of their official duties in public," he said. However, journalists cannot impede their efforts to perform these duties, he adds. — John Watson, a lawyer and a media law professor at American University in Washington.

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