This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

Next America measured bachelor-degree attainment among 37 cities that have a Latino population of at least 200,000 people.

BEST CITIES: Miami, Florida Total Population: 5,564,635 Percent of population that is Latino: 42% Percent of Latino population with a bachelor's degree: 26% (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Washington, D.C. Total Population: 5,582,170 Percent of population that is Latino: 14% Percent of Latino population with a bachelor's degree: 23% (Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Orlando, Florida Total Population: 2,134,411 Percent of population that is Latino: 25% Percent of Latino population with a bachelor's degree: 20% (Chad Sparkes/Flickr Creative Commons)
Boston, Massachusetts Total Population: 4,552,402 Percent of Latino: 9% Percent of Latino population with a bachelor's degree: 20% (Medill News21/Flickr Creative Commons)
San Francisco, California Total Population: 4,335,391 Percent of Latino: 22% Percent of Latino population with a bachelor's degree: 18% (Kevin Stanchfield/ Flickr Creative Commons)
WORST CITIES: Bakersfield, California Total Population: 839,631 Percent of population that is Latino: 49% Percent of Latino population with a bachelor's degree: 5% (Michael Lewis/Flickr Creative Commons)
Visalia, California Total Population: 442,179 Percent of population that is Latino: 61% Percent of Latino population with a bachelor's degree: 6% (Jeff/ Flickr Commercial Use)
Salinas, California Total Population: 415,057 Percent of population that is Latino: 55% Percent of Latino population with a bachelor's degree: 7% (Naotake Murayama/Flickr Creative Commons)
Stockton, California Total Population: 685,306 Percent of population that is Latino: 39% Percent of Latino population with a bachelor's degree: 7% (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Modesto, California Total Population: 514,453 Percent of population that is Latino: 42% Percent of Latino population with a bachelor's degree: 7% (Rocor/Flickr Creative Commons)

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

This story is part of our Next America: Workforce project, which is supported by a grant from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

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