Former Texas Governor Rick Perry speaks to supporters after announcing that he will run for president in 2016 June 4, 2015 in Dallas, Texas.National Journal

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry joined the legions of Republicans running for president Thursday. And he kicked off his announcement with a country-rap song about him.

The song, as BuzzFeed's Rosie Gray reports, is "Answer to No One" by Colt Ford featuring JJ Lawhorn, a foot-stomping country-rap anthem that draws heavily from Queen's "We Will Rock You."

The music video for the song was released in October 2012, but has been rebooted with new, Perry-centric lyrics:

VERSE 1:

Shotgun toter / Republican voter

Rick Perry supporter / Let's protect our border

To heck with anyone who don't believe in the USA / Rick Perry all the way!

CHORUS:

I won't back up / I don't back down

I've been raised up to stand my ground

Take my job but not my gun

Tax my check 'til I ain't got none

Except for the good lord up above

I answer to no one

VERSE 2:

Give me right to vote / My right to tote

The weapon of my choice / Don't (???) my voice

Hate me if you want / Or love me if you can

If the truth is what you want then you've found your man

I ain't backin' down / I ain't backin' up

If you think like I think then crank it on up!

CHORUS:

I won't back up / I don't back down

I've been raised up to stand my ground

Take my job but not my gun

Tax my check 'til I ain't got none

Except for the good lord up above

I answer to no one

I answer to no one

While the song is entertaining on its own, it's a good indication of how Perry is rebranding himself compared to his 2012 bid. After taking the stage Thursday, Perry spent part of his speech attempting to appeal to younger voters.

"I want to speak to the millennials just a moment," Perry said in his speech on Thursday. "Massive debt, passed on from our generation to yours, is a breaking of a social compact. You deserve better. I am going to offer a responsible plan to fix the entitlement system, and to stop this theft from your generation."

Perry's focus on entitlements has not changed much since his last presidential bid, but his focus on younger voters has. His views on social issues, however, often diverge from those of the younger people he's trying to woo. In 2012, Perry drew praise from children of illegal immigrants for signing the DREAM Act, but he has since drawn back from that support as if from a hot stove. Perry now maintains that undocumented immigrants should not be given a pathway to citizenship until he sees an increase in border security. A recent Pew poll found that 81 percent of 18-to-29-year-olds think undocumented immigrants already living in the U.S. should be allowed to stay.

In one infamous campaign ad from 2012, Perry said: "You don't need to be in the pew every Sunday to know that there's something wrong in this country when gays can serve openly in the military but our kids can't openly celebrate Christmas or pray in school." He opposes gay marriage, but recently said he would "probably" attend a gay wedding. 

Fundamental Christian views like these may play well in a Republican primary, but they don't align so well with younger voters. A 2010 Gallup poll found that 75 percent of 18-to-29-year olds supported repealing "Don't Ask, Don't Tell." This time around, Perry appears to be trying to reinvent himself as a conservative economic populist, one who glosses over social issues that could alienate millennials. And hey, check out those hip glasses!

Unlike Sen. Rand Paul—another 2016 candidate trying to appeal to younger voters—Perry oscillates between moderate and very conservative views. If Perry wants to capture a higher share of young voters than past Republican candidates, he'll have a tricky balancing act to pull off in the primary. In 2012, Mitt Romney ripped into Perry for calling Social Security a "Ponzi scheme"—and was able to deliver a one-two punch to Perry from the left on entitlements and from the right on immigration.

This time around, Perry can't afford to open himself up to similar critiques, so it appears as if he's trying to tack farther right while simultaneously giving lip service to more independent younger voters. Appealing to millennials makes for good stump speech copy, but millennials themselves aren't exactly a powerful constituency in the Republican primary race.

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