It may be the most important score in Washington.

In the world of government, few votes are more closely scrutinized than those of the Supreme Court, be it a 9-0 blowout or a 5-4 split. Indeed, SCOTUSBlog's statistical-analysis package devotes a whole section to narrow votes.

Some patterns are easy to predict. Conservative justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas often agree. So do Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer. But how often do Ginsburg and Scalia join in dissent against the rest of the Court? And when did Chief Justice John Roberts join with the liberal wing, as he did in upholding Obamacare last week?

Using data from the Supreme Court Database and SCOTUSblog's 2014 Stat Pack, we built a tool letting you run the numbers yourself, followed by some notable combinations.

 

The 5-4 conservative split

This is the most common nonunanimous combination, pitting Republican-appointed Roberts, Scalia, Thomas, Alito, and Kennedy against Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayor, and Kagan. We recently saw this split in decisions on lethal injection, restrictions on power plants, and raisin stockpiles.

 

The conservative wing's power rests on Kennedy, the crucial swing vote. Because what he can give...

The 5-4 liberal victory

...he can take away.

The next most-common configuration has Kennedy, Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayer, and Kagan in the majority against Roberts, Scalia, Thomas, and Alito. This critical combination legalized same-sex marriage in the United States last week.

 

OK, these are expected. How about something more unusual?

John Roberts, turncoat

Roberts has joined with the liberal wing against every other GOP-appointed justice exactly one time: The first decision to uphold Obamacare in 2012.

If you take Kennedy out of the dissent, Roberts has sided with Democratic-appointed justices six times, including last week's decision to uphold Obamacare subsidies.

 

Liberal-conservative allies against the world

There have also been a few unlikely pairings in dissents. Thomas and Breyer joined together in 2011 to oppose the majority's decision striking down regulations against selling violent video games to minors. And in 2012, Ginsburg and Scalia both dissented from a decision on sex-offender registration.

Then there's Ginsburg and Thomas, who have twice united in opposition.

 

The 5-4 conservative split

This is the most common nonunanimous combination, pitting Republican-appointed Roberts, Scalia, Thomas, Alito, and Kennedy against Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayor, and Kagan. We recently saw this split in decisions on lethal injection, restrictions on power plants, and raisin stockpiles.

 

The conservative wing's power rests on Kennedy, the crucial swing vote. Because what he can give...

The 5-4 liberal victory

...he can take away.

The next most-common configuration has Kennedy, Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayer, and Kagan in the majority against Roberts, Scalia, Thomas, and Alito. This critical combination legalized same-sex marriage in the United States last week.

 

OK, these are expected. How about something more unusual?

John Roberts, turncoat

Roberts has joined with the liberal wing against every other GOP-appointed justice exactly one time: The first decision to uphold Obamacare in 2012.

If you take Kennedy out of the dissent, Roberts has sided with Democratic-appointed justices six times, including last week's decision to uphold Obamacare subsidies.

 

Liberal-conservative allies against the world

There have also been a few unlikely pairings in dissents. Thomas and Breyer joined together in 2011 to oppose the majority's decision striking down regulations against selling violent video games to minors. And in 2012, Ginsburg and Scalia both dissented from a decision on sex-offender registration.

Then there's Ginsburg and Thomas, who have twice united in opposition.

 

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.