"Run Warren Run" has, well, stopped running.

MoveOn.org and Democracy for America, the two liberal groups behind the Run Warren Run campaign, announced Tuesday that they were suspending their efforts to support Sen. Elizabeth Warren for president. The Democrat from Massachusetts has repeatedly said she will not run in 2016.

This week, the groups will give Warren a petition signed by 365,000 supporters, in one last push to encourage her to enter the race, and then back down.

"The groups will then rest their case and suspend their draft effort," the groups said in a statement.

Since December 2014, the two organizations have pledged to raise $1.25 million toward the effort. They've opened offices in Iowa and New Hampshire, and held more than 400 campaign events, like house parties and rallies, for a prospective Warren candidacy.

Run Warren Run has pointed to Warren as an alternative to Hillary Clinton, whose close ties to the financial industry and previous support of trade agreements—Clinton once called the Trans-Pacific Partnership a "gold standard"—irk progressive groups.

Warren, however, has vehemently denied she's interested in the race. A day after Clinton announced her presidential campaign in April, Warren spoke at an event with environmentalists and labor unions. People held up "Run Warren Run" signs there, but Warren ignored them and stuck to her talking points.

Ready for Warren, another group hoping to recruit Warren into the race, said in a statement Tuesday that they are not willing to give up on the idea of a Warren candidacy just yet.

"Our work isn't done, and Ready for Warren will continue to focus on making Warren and the values she champions part of the 2016 election, as well as getting Warren's back in fights that matter to her, from the Trans-Pacific Partnership and student debt to taking on Wall Street and expanding Social Security," said Erica Sagrans, the group's campaign manager.

MoveOn.org and Democracy for America said they will now focus on helping Warren and other progressives in their opposition against the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership and the trade-promotion authority President Obama wants. Warren has been one of the loudest critics of both, much to the chagrin of the administration, which has called her "wrong" on the matters.

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