This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

Aliens attack, Putin rejoices, chaos ensues, Armageddon begins.

Twitter has turned the power of collective mockery against supporters of NSA surveillance programs, and these are just some of the scenarios users have predicted should the Patriot Act expire Sunday night.

Using the hashtag #ifthepatriotactexpires, users are presenting their visions of a world without the National Security Agency's dragnet surveillance and other programs sanctioned by the Patriot Act. And it's not pretty.

Aliens

Putin

Chaos

Armageddon

Multiple users said their submissions were inspired by journalist Glenn Greenwald's Thursday morning article about "fear-mongering" from The New York Times, which recently quoted anonymous U.S. officials predicting the worst if the Patriot Act expires.

"What you're doing, essentially, is you're playing national security Russian roulette," one senior administration official told the Times.

The White House said Wednesday that the programs would start shutting down Sunday at 8 p.m. if the NSA loses its authority to continue its bulk surveillance programs. Here's what's actually likely to happen if the programs shut down.

Putin

Chaos

Armageddon

Multiple users said their submissions were inspired by journalist Glenn Greenwald's Thursday morning article about "fear-mongering" from The New York Times, which recently quoted anonymous U.S. officials predicting the worst if the Patriot Act expires.

"What you're doing, essentially, is you're playing national security Russian roulette," one senior administration official told the Times.

The White House said Wednesday that the programs would start shutting down Sunday at 8 p.m. if the NSA loses its authority to continue its bulk surveillance programs. Here's what's actually likely to happen if the programs shut down.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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