This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

The Rubio campaign only had to get through seven more hours until the Florida senator's planned presidential announcement if they didn't want a spoiler-alert leak to take away his thunder.

But alas, it was not to be. In a conference call Monday morning, AP reports Marco Rubio told donors he's running for president, indicating he's "uniquely qualified" to represent the GOP in the 2016 race. Later Monday evening, he's scheduled to appear at the Freedom Tower in Miami—the Ellis Island of Cuban exiles—to officially kick off his bid.

Rubio, who's in the midst of his first term as a Republican senator from Florida, is expected to give Jeb Bush, a fellow Floridian and former governor of the state, a run for his money. Much of Rubio's public orations have focused on what he sees as his family's attainment of the American dream. According to AP's report, he told donors that his campaign will aim to help American families for whom "the dream" has not yet been secured.

On the call, Rubio said that this cycle the GOP has the makings to be "the party of the future," and he took a hit at Hillary Clinton—who announced her candidacy on Sunday—as a figure of the past.

"Just yesterday, we heard from a leader from yesterday who wants to take us back to yesterday," Rubio said. "But I feel that this country has always been about tomorrow."

In the style of Ted Cruz and Rand Paul—who declared their respective candidacies last week—Rubio hadn't been shy about promoting his planned speech. Social-media posts teased the "big announcement," and the campaign posted a video compilation of previous Rubio speeches as a "preview" of what he plans to say Monday evening. Ahead of the campaign news Monday morning, "Team Rubio" turned over photos of his speech preparation to Independent Journal Review.

The promotion continued in the minutes following the leak. As is now tradition with declared White House contenders (as of last week), the Florida senator's campaign immediately took to Twitter to promote the news. Rubio, if elected, would be one of the youngest presidents to ever occupy the Oval, and his team composed decidedly youthful tweets in the wake of the news breaking.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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