On July 12, 2011, crew from the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy retrieved a canister dropped by parachute from a C-130, which brought supplies for some mid-mission fixes. The ICESCAPE mission, or "Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment," is NASA's two-year shipborne investigation to study how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the ocean's chemistry and ecosystems. The bulk of the research takes place in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas in summer 2010 and 2011. Credit: NASA/Kathryn Hansen On July 12, 2011, crew from the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy retrieved a canister dropped by parachute from a C-130, which brought supplies for some mid-mission fixes.The ICESCAPE mission, or "Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment," is NASA's two-year shipborne investigation to study how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the ocean's chemistry and ecosystems. The bulk of the research takes place in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas in summer 2010 and 2011.Credit: NASA/Kathryn Hansen  National Journal

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Global warming can be a touchy subject—and many Americans would rather not talk about it.

A whopping 74 percent of Americans "never" or "rarely" discuss global warming, while just 26 percent of Americans talk about it "often" or "occasionally," according to a national survey from the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication released Monday.

And 25 percent of Americans say people they know never talk about global warming at all, despite the fact that a majority of the public believes the planet is heating up and the scientific consensus that global warming is driven primarily by human activity.

The lack of buzz may signal apathy from the American public when it comes time to talk about climate change. People tend to be far less concerned about climate change than they are about other threats that they believe are more immediate, like a flailing economy or terrorist attack.

The survey results are based on interviews with 1,263 Americans ages 18 and older with a margin of error of plus or minus three percentage points.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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