This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

More than 16 million uninsured Americans have gained health coverage since several of the Affordable Care Act's provisions took effect, according to an Obama administration report released Monday, a week before the law's five-year anniversary.

This includes 14.1 million adults who gained health insurance from the beginning of open enrollment in October 2013 to the beginning of this month. It also includes 2.3 million young adults ages 19-25 who gained coverage between 2010 and the beginning of open enrollment because of the provision allowing them to remain on their parents' plan until they turn 26.

Since open enrollment, the national rate of uninsured Americans has dropped from 20.3 percent to 13.2 percent—a 35 percent reduction.

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell called this "the largest reduction in the uninsured in four decades."

"When it comes to the key metrics of affordability, access, and quality, the evidence shows that the Affordable Care Act is working, and families, businesses, and taxpayers are better off as a result," Burwell said.

The uninsured rate has dropped for all races and ethnicities, the report states. The rate dropped the most for Latinos, down 12.3 percentage points, resulting in 4.2 million adults gaining coverage. African-Americans saw a 9.2 percentage point decrease, meaning 2.3 million adults gained coverage. And whites saw a 5.3 percentage point decrease in unemployment, meaning 6.6 million adults gained coverage.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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