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Loretta Lynch's nomination to be attorney general is likely to hit the Senate floor next week, amid increasing grumbles from Republicans who are unhappy with her record or with the Obama administration's overall handling of the Justice Department.

"I think we'll deal with that next week," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters Tuesday, after he was asked about the status of Lynch's nomination.

The nomination of Lynch, currently the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York, passed out of the Senate Judiciary Committee Feb. 26 on a 12-8 vote. Several of the Republicans who voted against her have focused specifically on President Obama's executive action deferring deportation for millions of undocumented immigrants. Lynch's public foes include Sens. Rand Paul and Ted Cruz, both of whom are angling for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination.

What's not clear is whether Cruz, Paul, or any other opponents will seek to block or slow Lynch's nomination on the floor. Even many Republicans have said they expect Lynch to be confirmed eventually, and many of them are eager for the exit of current Attorney General Eric Holder, who is staying on until his successor is in place.

"I'm glad to hear that Senator McConnell wants to move her on the floor next week, but we hope some of his colleagues won't hold her up," Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer said Tuesday.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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