This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

Former Rep. Vance McAllister would consider a bid for Sen. David Vitter's seat if Vitter is elected governor of Louisiana in 2015, he recently told LaPolitics.com.

McAllister, who won a House seat in a 2013 special election but lasted barely more than a year in office, is now known as the "kissing congressman" after video surveillance footage captured him kissing an aide in his Monroe district office soon after he was sworn in. Both McAllister and the woman were married, and the lawmaker faced calls from within his party to resign from Congress.

McAllister announced in April 2014 that he wouldn't seek reelection to the House, but he reversed that decision just over two months later and embarked on a quixotic reelection bid. He didn't even qualify for a runoff in his 5th District, finishing in fourth place in a "jungle primary" with just 11 percent of the vote. New Rep. Ralph Abraham won the seat in the December runoff.

McAllister told LaPolitics's Jeremy Alford that if Rep. John Fleming, a Republican former colleague, was the only Republican to seek Vitter's seat, he would consider a bid himself. McAllister criticized the Fleming, who recently helped found a new conservative caucus in the House, for being "the wrong kind of Republican."

"If [Fleming] is the only one running, I would consider it," McAllister told the site. "I don't have a problem being against another Republican if it's the wrong kind of Republican running. We don't need another Ted Cruz."

Vitter is the early favorite to win the governor's race, and so far Fleming has been the only member of Louisiana's House delegation to voice interest in Vitter's seat. If Vitter becomes the state's chief executive, he would get to appoint his own successor to fill the remainder of his Senate term, through 2016. There has been no word on who Vitter would choose.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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