I've mentioned in some previous updates—a full index is after the jump—that most of the response I've received on "The Tragedy of the American Military" has been from people with some military connection. While many of these readers have disagreed on details, most have accepted the larger "chickenhawk" premise. That is: that we have become a nation willing to do anything for its military except take it seriously, and thus we keep sending troops on an open-ended series of unwinnable wars.

What is it like when people disagree not with the details but with the main premise? Here is a sample, from a reader in Massachusetts:

Your characterization of the American public as chicken hawks is not accurate. They/we are mostly ignorant of the reasons for our country's belligerent foreign policy. And they/we are generally uninvolved in foreign policy debates, which mostly don't happen anymore, as you noted in your piece.

I wondered why you didn't choose to mention that most famous American chicken hawk, if there ever was one, Dick Cheney. Also, you failed to mention that when polled, Americans often are not in favor of war. We are more peaceniks than chicken hawks.

You also don't mention the fact that the Pentagon hasn't been audited in over 10 years and that Congress finds this huge budget issue very uninteresting, not worthy of debate. Now, they are very concerned when an opportunity arises to cut food stamps or unemployment, but not 700 billion and more in Pentagon spending.

Something doesn't add up here, yes? How about tackling this story?

Another propaganda message about the struggle against profiteers (Shanghai Propaganda Poster Art Centre)

What are your thoughts on how your corporate sponsors affect your choice of story line? There could be more profit in peace than in war, but you would have to step on some toes to point this out. For every million, or billion, dollars spent by the Pentagon, many more jobs would be created if the same amount were spent on education, health care, alternative energy, you name it.

Also your piece on Americans' relationship with the military would be more complete if you mentioned Marine officer Smedley Butler [JF note: the celebrated early 20th century warrior and major general] who said famously that "War is a racket. The few profit, the many pay." Or words to that effect. He figured this out 100 years ago while fighting in US wars in Central America to make the world safe for United Fruit.

Most of your responses have come from ex-military and maybe that is the conversation you prefer to have.

But if you want Americans as a whole to enter in, you'll need to address the bigger picture: the Pentagon budget, the rubber-stamping of the corporate agenda by Congress in all areas, and the lack of a real democratic process around our military and all aspects of government.

"The war is over, my boy. Forget it!" Life magazine, 1919 (OldMagazineArticles.com)

I'll leave this reader's message on its own, except to say: I've made my points about former V.P Cheney over the years, for instance here and here; and an assumption that we invested in and highlighted this story in an effort to please our advertisers would not be correct.

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Here is a running index of previous installments:

"The Tragedy of the American Military," my article in the Jan-Feb issue. A C-Span interview is here; an NPR "All Things Considered" interview is here; a PBS News Hour interview and segment is here. I will be doing the Bill Maher show next week.

1) Initial responses, including an argument for the draft.

2) Whether Israel comes closer to a civil-military connection than the U.S. does.

3) "Quiet Gratitude, or Dangerous Contempt?" How veterans respond to "thank you for your service."

4) "Actually We Keep Winning." An argument that things are better than I claim.

5) "Get the Hell Back in Your Foxhole." More on the meaning of "thanks."

6) "Showing Gratitude in a Way that Matters." What civilians could do that counts.

7) "Winning Battles, Losing Wars." A response to #4.

8) "The Economic Realities of a Trillion Dollar Budget." What we could, or should, learn from the Soviet Union.

9) "Meanwhile, the Realities." Fancy weapons are sexy. Boring weapons save troops' lives.

10) "Chickenhawks in the News." The 2012 presidential campaign avoided foreign-policy and military issues. What about 2016?

11) "A Failure of Grand Strategy." Half a league, half a league, half a league onward ...

12) "Careerism and Competence," including the testimony of an A-10 pilot who decided to resign.

13) "Vandergriff as Yoda." A modest proposal for shaking things up.

14) "Lions Led by Lambs." On a possible generation gap among military officers.

15) "Is it all up to the vets?" The possible political and cultural role of the the latest generation of veterans.

16) "We're Not Chickenhawks," the one you are reading now.