This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

On Monday, Sid Miller, Texas's newly elected agriculture commissioner, said the following:

"I'm announcing that I am giving full amnesty to the cupcakes in Texas," he said to cheers, standing beside a table of treats, according to FOX 26 Houston. "I'm also granting full pardon to pies and cookies and brownies and cakes and homemade candies."

The reason for such a pastry pardon? The Texas Agriculture Department used to restrict parents from handing out fatty and sugary foods at school birthday parties and the like. Miller wasn't a fan of the policy. With his election came a promise to do away with the brownie ban.

"I think it's just plain wrong to tell a mother and grandmother that they can't bring cookies to school for their children for some type of party or celebration," Miller said Monday at the news conference, where he also ate a cupcake.

The thing is, the rule had already been overturned in July. Miller just wanted to tell his constituents that as agriculture commissioner, he would never reinstate it. "If you ask me, that sounds like something from the Obama administration," Miller said, according to The Texas Tribune. "I can't believe we would be doing that here in Texas." 

Miller was elected on a very conservative platform: "Pro-life, pro-guns, pro-family, pro-business, pro-military, pro-Constitution, and anti-Obama," he told supporters on election night. So after all that rhetoric, why go after cupcakes as his first move in office? 

According to Greg Groogan, the "cupcake-loving" reporter in the Fox clip below, Miller "was clearly aching to unleash some liberty." And perhaps just celebrate his first official act as commissioner with some treats. The event is a reminder of how delightfully odd local politics can be.

In its story about the cupcake pledge, the Tribune noted that the rate of obseity in Texas high schools is increasing. Buzzkill.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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