This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

Before leaving office, President Obama intends to make good on an old promise: closing the prison at Guantanamo Bay.

In his address Tuesday night, Obama said that his administration will work to finally close the prison.

"As Americans, we have a profound commitment to justice—so it makes no sense to spend three million dollars per prisoner to keep open a prison that the world condemns and terrorists use to recruit," Obama said. "Since I've been president, we've worked responsibly to cut the population of Gitmo in half. Now it's time to finish the job."

It's a familiar promise. During his first month in office, Obama issued an executive order vowing to close the controversial prison within a year. He followed that up with a declaration, in his first address to a joint session of Congress, that he would "seek swift and certain justice for captured terrorists."

That was six years ago. But the president's goal, he says, hasn't wavered: In Tuesday's address, he said that he "will not relent in my determination to shut it down." To his prepared remarks, he added: "It's time to close Gitmo."

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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