This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

If you were hoping for a presidential election full of more promises of colonies on the moon, prepare to be disappointed. Newt Gingrich is not running for president in 2016.

The former House speaker told National Journal during a phone interview Thursday that he is not going to seek another bid for the White House alongside an already increasingly growing field of candidates.

"I am not considering a run," Gingrich said.

Gingrich is, however, already playing the role of party elder. On Saturday, Gingrich spoke with Mitt Romney, who told donors last week he is seriously considering another run for the White House. Gingrich said Romney, his competitor in 2012, is a "serious man" and it was a "free country," but he did offer Romney a warning.

"I'll tell you what I told him. There are no front-runners. There are a lot of runners," Gingrich told National Journal. He conveyed his conversation to The Washington Post earlier this week. "It will be a brawl and someone will be left standing when it is over," Gingrich said Thursday. "He certainly has every right to run if he wants to."

Gingrich said, however, that Romney may find that voters will have some questions they want answered.

"People are going to ask him, as The Wall Street Journal did this morning, 'What would he do different and why should we expect any different outcome?' He has to have an answer for that, just like Jeb Bush has to have some larger morally compelling vision of why he wants to run."

Gingrich warned that the next GOP candidate will have to be younger and fresher than Hillary Clinton in order to win.

"Name I.D. alone is not enough," he said. "We will nominate someone who is younger than Sec. Clinton, more articulate than Sec. Clinton and has more ideas than Sec. Clinton."

In an interview with Fox News host Greta Van Susteren in 2013, Gingrich had said not to count him out for 2016 and that he would make his decision this year.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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