National Journal

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

Appearing on The Late Show Wednesday night, Sen. Elizabeth Warren told David Letterman about the fateful phone call that launched her career in Washington and vaulted her into national politics.

The story involves a barbecue, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, and a golden retriever named Otis. Watch:

After that call from Reid, Warren went to Washington to head up a congressional oversight panel on the 2008 financial crisis, launch the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, beat out Scott Brown in an upset Senate victory, and take the helm as progressives' favorite candidate ahead of the 2016 presidential election.

On Wednesday, Warren showed no signs of toning down her fiery rhetoric against the Wall Street banks that the government bailed out in 2008.

"They threw all in to save the biggest financial institutions in this country, but not so much to help middle-class families," Warren said. "That is fundamentally wrong, and that is something we must change."

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.