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As President Obama addressed the American people tonight on the administration's plans to "degrade and ultimately destroy" ISIS, he repeatedly mentioned that he wants Congress's support for his plans. On Twitter, Congress's reaction during and immediately after the speech was either disparaging, supportive, or completely off-topic. Here's a classification of the most common congressional responses:

Benghazi

At one point, Obama noted that "tomorrow marks 13 years since our country was attacked." But he didn't mention that tomorrow is also the anniversary of the Benghazi attack:

Quotes and observations related to the speech

Joe Biden is a good Vice President (and President of the Senate) in the way a good wingman talks you up to potential dates:

Rep. Steve Stockman noted that Christian charities are also assisting refugees:

Criticisms of completely unrelated policy issues

Here we have the scheduled manual tweets that possibly should have been scheduled for another time. Or maybe this evening really was a good time to also talk about net neutrality:

Obamacare:

and Keystone:

Here is a statement on what Obama just said

As soon as the president finished speaking, Congressional offices released a massive wave of statements about the need for [insert vague description of a strategy here]. Many of these statements were filled with "but"s. For example, Rep. Linda Sanchez supports heightened aggression against ISIS, but "I have reservations about expanding airstrikes into Syria." Speaker John Boehner supports training and equipping Iraqi forces, "but I remain concerned that those measures could take years to fully implement at a time when ISIL’s momentum and territorial gains need to be immediately halted and reversed."

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy supports pretty much everything Obama wants to do, but...  "But more must be done ... We must recognize ISIL is but a symptom of a broader terrorist threat that has been ignored for too long by this Administration."

What do you think?

Some members of Congress know that the best way to engage with your followers is to start a conversation:

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