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How do people deal with the torrent of information pouring down on us all? What sources can't they live without? We regularly reach out to prominent figures in media, entertainment, politics, the arts, and the literary world to hear their answers. This is drawn from a phone conversation with Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), the chairman of the House Budget Committee and the 2012 Republican vice presidential nominee. Ryan, who is considering a run for president in 2016, published a new book last week, The Way Forward: Reclaiming the American Idea.

I start the morning watching the "Squawk Box" [on CNBC] when I get ready. I go to the gym, leave, and I read The Wall Street Journal, and then I read these clipping services that the House Republicans put out, which are just sort of a daily rundown of the day's news. I just click on the articles that look interesting. Then throughout the day or in the evening I typically go on RealClearMarkets and RealClearWorld and RealClearPolitics, probably in that order. 

That's usually morning and night. During the day, I'm just so busy. If I'm home, in Wisconsin, I'll do that in the car, traveling between places. I'll usually have something with me to read and make phone calls. But in D.C. I don't have time to get on a computer. The phone's a little small for me. I'm more of an iPad or desktop guy.

I have Twitter and Facebook. I do both. Usually to post something. I do follow Twitter to a varying degree. I'm not one of those obsessive, you know, every-hour Twitter types. I'll look at it once or twice a day, and it's usually the news feeds. You know, the [Associated Press] and the rest, and some conservatives and friends that I follow. If there's something happening quickly in the news, I'll go on Twitter, because it's the fastest way to see what's happening.

I'll do most of my reading in the evening. I'll read longer memos or articles or RealClear. At home, it's sports, news and movies.

You can read more from The Wire's interview with Ryan here.

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