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The Republican National Committee is one step closer to choosing a host city for its 2016 convention, after narrowing the choices down to the "world class" cities of ... Cleveland, Ohio and Dallas, Texas. How exciting.

"After visiting both cities, I can say to my fellow Republicans that we should be excited for the 2016 convention," the RNC’s Site Selection Committee, Chairwoman Enid Mickelsen, wrote in a press release. "These world class cities know how to roll out the welcome mat." If asked, we would have recommended Denver, but given the options here's how the cities stack up:

Money

Conventions don't pay for themselves. Literally — the RNC has said that they're unable to spend money on the convention like the have in the past, meaning it'll be up to the host city to foot the bill of about $55 million to $60 million, according to the Associated Press

Winner: Dallas has more wealthy donors. 

Most Convincing

Both cities make their own pitches on their campaign sites. Cleveland "is the heart of the ultimate swing state," and Dallas, is "the right choice" because it's "a Top-5 U.S. destination for meetings and conventions."

Winner: Republicans hosting a convention in Dallas makes about as much sense as Democrats hosting theirs in New York City. Cleveland

Attractions

Cleveland has the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, a museum that is probably not as cool as it sounds, but still pretty cool. That's pretty much it. Dallas has the George W. Bush Library and Museum, which is probably more interesting than it sounds. 

Winner: Dallas, since older conservatives will probably prefer the Bush library. 

Weather

Tampa, Florida probably seems like a good place to have a convention, but the 2012 convention there was delayed thanks to Hurricane Isaac. Both Dallas and Cleveland are hot and humid. It's more likely to rain in Cleveland. 

Winner: Dallas sounds slighty less awful.

Overall

 

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