National Journal

Donald Trump would like you to know he's building perhaps the "most luxurious" hotel in the world in Washington, right down the street from the White House.

He would like you to know that before coming to the Conservative Political Action Conference this year, he was tending to a $250 million resort. Celebrities were there. But when CPAC calls, you show up.

He would like you to know that China can devalue its currency because they perceive the president as being weak. Ditto for Putin invading Ukraine.

He would like you to know that Obama is now a worse president than the "late great Jimmy Carter," who is still among the living.

And that he won't use a teleprompter because everyone else is using them.

He says things like "who is the soldier that carries satchels of $50 million to take care of these people?"

And "I said it two years ago, I knew because I have a lot of friends from China. By the way, I don't dislike China."

And "No matter how many times you say rip down the fence and let everyone in, you're not going to get the votes."

And "I assume we're taking the oil," in relation to the Iraq war.

All of these are headlines or details in stories you might see about Trump's speech at CPAC. And they show that Trump has a remarkable ability to create sound bites and news.

He puts on a good show.

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