National Journal

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

Half a year later, the Snowden files keep coming. 

Today, NBC reports on a leaked presentation from the Government Communications Headquarters, the British counterpart of the National Security Agency, that explains the agency's capabilities to track activity on sites like YouTube. Given the vast amount of content available on the site, this makes reports of U.S. spying on library records in 2005 seem downright quaint.

But the slides themselves are a bit vexing. The presentation, titled "Psychology: A New Kind of SIGDEV," begins with an array of pictures illustrating psychological concepts, such as the photo above. Another includes an image of Capt. Sully Sullenberger, the pilot who safely landed a plane in the Hudson River. See the rest for yourself.

Granted, the NSA has been charged with making low-budget slide shows before. But the latest leaked slides induce a new level of head-scratching. Here's a question for starters: Why is "Psychology" spelled wrong? 

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.