This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

Interest Groups

Lyndsay Moseley Clearing the air: Lyndsay Moseley (Chet Susslin)

While Washington contemplates the politics of the president's climate-action plan, Lyndsay Moseley, the new director of the American Lung Association's Healthy Air Campaign, is determined to give voice to the human side of the debate.

"Too often, what's missing from the climate debate is a discussion of how air pollution impacts millions of Americans," Moseley says. "At the American Lung Association, we work with people all over the country who suffer from serious respiratory diseases, and we're focused on bringing their stories to Washington so that policymakers can see how their decisions actually affect people's lives."

Moseley, who comes from Louisville, Tenn., has a long history in the environmental sector. She has been with the Healthy Air Campaign, which works to uphold the Clean Air Act, for a little over two years, previously serving as deputy director and director of advocacy. She has also worked for the Sierra Club's Beyond Coal Campaign and the Interfaith Climate and Energy Campaign for the National Religious Partnership for the Environment.

In her new role, Moseley, 34, will oversee education and outreach efforts and guide the overall strategy and direction of the campaign. "We're dedicated to defending the Clean Air Act, which has come under scrutiny from some members of Congress who want to undermine fundamental health protections," Moseley says.

Clare Foran

 

At the Bar

Teresa Stanek Rea

Teresa "Terry" Stanek Rea's hometown of Detroit may be teetering on the brink of financial ruin, but she is bullish on the future of Motown.

"It's an amazingly talented, resilient city," says the former acting director of the Patent and Trademark Office, who earlier this month returned to the law firm Crowell & Moring. "I think everything is going to work out."

Fifty years ago, the Motor City was an engine of prosperity and a destination for young innovators. "When I grew up, I thought every dad was an engineer. Detroit was a technological mecca," Rea says. "Those were the boom years of the auto industry. Those were the early years of space travel.... I have no doubt those days will come again."

Rea will be a partner at Crowell & Moring, and a director with C&M International, an affiliated international trade and investment consulting firm. Upon leaving the PTO, Rea was approached by multiple firms on K Street, but she chose Crowell & Moring because "it comes closest to allowing me to engage the same or similar issues to what I handled in the government."

Rea, 69, studied pharmacy at the University of Michigan and is a licensed pharmacist. "My mother wanted me to be a medical doctor, my father wanted me to be a chemical engineer, so I became a pharmacist," she says.

After graduating, Rea worked as a hospital pharmacist while taking night classes at Wayne State University Law School. Her first job after receiving her J.D. was with Ethyl Corp., a chemical manufacturer, which dispatched her to Ferndale, Mich., and later Baton Rouge, La. "No one typically works for a corporation straight out of law school anymore, but I lucked out," she says. "Can you believe it? A corporation actually trained me!"

Rea came to Washington in 1984, when her husband was accepted to Georgetown University Law Center. Up to that point, she had not considered a career in government. "I probably only had a vague understanding of public policy," she says. "But this area is so steeped in everything federal, everything U.S. government, you can't help but develop an interest."

Before embarking on a public-service career, Rea was a partner at Crowell & Moring and served as president of the American Intellectual Property Law Association and the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

At the Patent and Trademark Office, she drafted and implemented regulations pursuant to the 2011 America Invents Act and served as the top Obama administration official in charge of intellectual-property policy. Rea regards intellectual property, which encompasses patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets, as the "driving force" of the U.S. economy.

She lives with her husband and three daughters in Alexandria, Va. "I'm very good at plants and gardening — probably because, unlike daughters, they do whatever I tell them."

Christopher Snow Hopkins

 

Lobby Shops

Carolyn Hicks Mayle Healthy Hoosier: Carolyn Hicks Mayle

Carolyn Hicks Mayle, the newest principal at the Bockorny Group, has been involved in every piece of health care legislation enacted in the past decade. As the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's chief health care lobbyist in the early 2000s, she represented corporate interests on issues ranging from medical-liability reform to a patients' bill of rights to the 2003 Medicare Modernization Act. More recently, as a senior lobbyist for WellPoint, she lobbied against the "public option," a government-funded health plan to compete with private plans, as lawmakers were drafting the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

As she puts it, "It's been an intense period of time."

At Bockorny, Mayle will engage Republican members of Congress on behalf of clients such as CVS Caremark and the American Hospital Association. One issue on her radar screen is the proposed "doc fix," which would amend the formula used to calculate physicians' fees under Medicare.

A "proud Hoosier," Mayle was raised in Indianapolis, where her father was an otolaryngologist. "There are very good people in Indiana," she says. "Put simply, people are really nice."

At Northwestern University, she studied history, with a minor in women's studies. "These disciplines don't really prepare you for much," Mayle concedes, but they did spark her interest in public policy. She started as an aide to her hometown representative, Republican then-Rep. Dan Burton, and later joined the staff of what was then called the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee.

In the years that followed, Mayle served as director of government relations for the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association's federal-employee program and as director of congressional and public affairs for General Motors. (She still drives a GM car.)

She was drawn to WellPoint — and lobbying in general — because it allowed her to "see all different perspectives," Mayle says. "They work with hospitals, they work with doctors, they work with employers large and small."

The 42-year-old is married to a former Navy fighter pilot and has a 3-year-old daughter. For her, she says, happiness is a "nice glass of wine and a slice of chocolate cake."

C.S.H.

 

Around the Agencies

Francesca Grifo

Francesca Grifo, the Environmental Protection Agency's newly appointed scientific-integrity official, is setting out to prove that science is the backbone of everything the agency does.

"EPA's mission is extremely broad, and the agency works on so many different programs and policies," she says. "But science is absolutely critical to carrying out all parts of that mission."

As the first to serve in the post full time, Grifo will work to improve and implement EPA's scientific-integrity policy, a blueprint for upholding rigorous standards of scientific analysis throughout the agency.

The 54-year-old native of Easton, Pa., will also oversee EPA's Scientific Integrity Committee, a group of officials from program and regional offices that meets quarterly.

Grifo, who completed her undergraduate degree at Smith College and holds a doctorate in botany from Cornell University, has a history of working to uphold scientific integrity.

Before joining EPA last month, she was a senior scientist and the director of the Union of Concerned Scientists' scientific-integrity program, and she has pressed the federal government for years to ensure that science is not twisted in service to ideology. She has also advocated for increased transparency and oversight of scientific analysis carried out at all levels of government.

Earlier, Grifo was director of Columbia University's graduate-policy workshop at the school's Center for Environmental Research and Conservation, and headed its science teachers' environmental-education program.

Grifo sees her current job as a way to combine her passion for science and the environment.

"My heart is really in environmental work," she says. "And I'm very excited about the work I'll be doing with scientific integrity at the agency, because it stretches across so many fields, including environmental policy. It will be a way for me to be involved in environmental work and environmental health issues and science for the public good, and I'll have so many opportunities to draw upon my past work experience."

That experience also includes a science and diplomacy fellowship at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Additionally, Grifo has worked for the National Institutes of Health, where she was the program manager for the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups program.

Grifo wants EPA to serve as a model for government. On scientific integrity, she says, "very few agencies have made it somebody's job to ensure that [such] policies are carried out. This is the place where the buck stops."

C.F.

Lyndsay Moseley Clearing the air: Lyndsay Moseley (Chet Susslin)

While Washington contemplates the politics of the president's climate-action plan, Lyndsay Moseley, the new director of the American Lung Association's Healthy Air Campaign, is determined to give voice to the human side of the debate.

"Too often, what's missing from the climate debate is a discussion of how air pollution impacts millions of Americans," Moseley says. "At the American Lung Association, we work with people all over the country who suffer from serious respiratory diseases, and we're focused on bringing their stories to Washington so that policymakers can see how their decisions actually affect people's lives."

Moseley, who comes from Louisville, Tenn., has a long history in the environmental sector. She has been with the Healthy Air Campaign, which works to uphold the Clean Air Act, for a little over two years, previously serving as deputy director and director of advocacy. She has also worked for the Sierra Club's Beyond Coal Campaign and the Interfaith Climate and Energy Campaign for the National Religious Partnership for the Environment.

In her new role, Moseley, 34, will oversee education and outreach efforts and guide the overall strategy and direction of the campaign. "We're dedicated to defending the Clean Air Act, which has come under scrutiny from some members of Congress who want to undermine fundamental health protections," Moseley says.

Clare Foran

 

At the Bar

Teresa Stanek Rea

Teresa "Terry" Stanek Rea's hometown of Detroit may be teetering on the brink of financial ruin, but she is bullish on the future of Motown.

"It's an amazingly talented, resilient city," says the former acting director of the Patent and Trademark Office, who earlier this month returned to the law firm Crowell & Moring. "I think everything is going to work out."

Fifty years ago, the Motor City was an engine of prosperity and a destination for young innovators. "When I grew up, I thought every dad was an engineer. Detroit was a technological mecca," Rea says. "Those were the boom years of the auto industry. Those were the early years of space travel.... I have no doubt those days will come again."

Rea will be a partner at Crowell & Moring, and a director with C&M International, an affiliated international trade and investment consulting firm. Upon leaving the PTO, Rea was approached by multiple firms on K Street, but she chose Crowell & Moring because "it comes closest to allowing me to engage the same or similar issues to what I handled in the government."

Rea, 69, studied pharmacy at the University of Michigan and is a licensed pharmacist. "My mother wanted me to be a medical doctor, my father wanted me to be a chemical engineer, so I became a pharmacist," she says.

After graduating, Rea worked as a hospital pharmacist while taking night classes at Wayne State University Law School. Her first job after receiving her J.D. was with Ethyl Corp., a chemical manufacturer, which dispatched her to Ferndale, Mich., and later Baton Rouge, La. "No one typically works for a corporation straight out of law school anymore, but I lucked out," she says. "Can you believe it? A corporation actually trained me!"

Rea came to Washington in 1984, when her husband was accepted to Georgetown University Law Center. Up to that point, she had not considered a career in government. "I probably only had a vague understanding of public policy," she says. "But this area is so steeped in everything federal, everything U.S. government, you can't help but develop an interest."

Before embarking on a public-service career, Rea was a partner at Crowell & Moring and served as president of the American Intellectual Property Law Association and the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

At the Patent and Trademark Office, she drafted and implemented regulations pursuant to the 2011 America Invents Act and served as the top Obama administration official in charge of intellectual-property policy. Rea regards intellectual property, which encompasses patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets, as the "driving force" of the U.S. economy.

She lives with her husband and three daughters in Alexandria, Va. "I'm very good at plants and gardening — probably because, unlike daughters, they do whatever I tell them."

Christopher Snow Hopkins

 

Lobby Shops

Carolyn Hicks Mayle Healthy Hoosier: Carolyn Hicks Mayle

Carolyn Hicks Mayle, the newest principal at the Bockorny Group, has been involved in every piece of health care legislation enacted in the past decade. As the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's chief health care lobbyist in the early 2000s, she represented corporate interests on issues ranging from medical-liability reform to a patients' bill of rights to the 2003 Medicare Modernization Act. More recently, as a senior lobbyist for WellPoint, she lobbied against the "public option," a government-funded health plan to compete with private plans, as lawmakers were drafting the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

As she puts it, "It's been an intense period of time."

At Bockorny, Mayle will engage Republican members of Congress on behalf of clients such as CVS Caremark and the American Hospital Association. One issue on her radar screen is the proposed "doc fix," which would amend the formula used to calculate physicians' fees under Medicare.

A "proud Hoosier," Mayle was raised in Indianapolis, where her father was an otolaryngologist. "There are very good people in Indiana," she says. "Put simply, people are really nice."

At Northwestern University, she studied history, with a minor in women's studies. "These disciplines don't really prepare you for much," Mayle concedes, but they did spark her interest in public policy. She started as an aide to her hometown representative, Republican then-Rep. Dan Burton, and later joined the staff of what was then called the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee.

In the years that followed, Mayle served as director of government relations for the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association's federal-employee program and as director of congressional and public affairs for General Motors. (She still drives a GM car.)

She was drawn to WellPoint — and lobbying in general — because it allowed her to "see all different perspectives," Mayle says. "They work with hospitals, they work with doctors, they work with employers large and small."

The 42-year-old is married to a former Navy fighter pilot and has a 3-year-old daughter. For her, she says, happiness is a "nice glass of wine and a slice of chocolate cake."

C.S.H.

 

Around the Agencies

Francesca Grifo

Francesca Grifo, the Environmental Protection Agency's newly appointed scientific-integrity official, is setting out to prove that science is the backbone of everything the agency does.

"EPA's mission is extremely broad, and the agency works on so many different programs and policies," she says. "But science is absolutely critical to carrying out all parts of that mission."

As the first to serve in the post full time, Grifo will work to improve and implement EPA's scientific-integrity policy, a blueprint for upholding rigorous standards of scientific analysis throughout the agency.

The 54-year-old native of Easton, Pa., will also oversee EPA's Scientific Integrity Committee, a group of officials from program and regional offices that meets quarterly.

Grifo, who completed her undergraduate degree at Smith College and holds a doctorate in botany from Cornell University, has a history of working to uphold scientific integrity.

Before joining EPA last month, she was a senior scientist and the director of the Union of Concerned Scientists' scientific-integrity program, and she has pressed the federal government for years to ensure that science is not twisted in service to ideology. She has also advocated for increased transparency and oversight of scientific analysis carried out at all levels of government.

Earlier, Grifo was director of Columbia University's graduate-policy workshop at the school's Center for Environmental Research and Conservation, and headed its science teachers' environmental-education program.

Grifo sees her current job as a way to combine her passion for science and the environment.

"My heart is really in environmental work," she says. "And I'm very excited about the work I'll be doing with scientific integrity at the agency, because it stretches across so many fields, including environmental policy. It will be a way for me to be involved in environmental work and environmental health issues and science for the public good, and I'll have so many opportunities to draw upon my past work experience."

That experience also includes a science and diplomacy fellowship at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Additionally, Grifo has worked for the National Institutes of Health, where she was the program manager for the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups program.

Grifo wants EPA to serve as a model for government. On scientific integrity, she says, "very few agencies have made it somebody's job to ensure that [such] policies are carried out. This is the place where the buck stops."

C.F.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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