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The Ready for Hillary super PAC is convening in New York City today to plot her 2016 victory. About 170 donors and a dozen political operatives have been in and out of meetings at the Parker Meridien Hotel all day, "coming up with plans on how to engage emerging constituencies that will be incredibly important if there’s a primary and in a general — whether that’s women, African-Americans, Latinos, LGBT," former Obama campaign organizer Mitch Stewart told The New York Times. Oh, and they'll be snapping up Hillary swag like this iPhone case:

Cute merchandise like this (a play on the Texts From Hillary tumblr) is more strategic than you think. The super PAC's main goal is to gin up grassroots support from youth and minority voters that Hillary lost to President Obama in 2008. The Times reports, "the strategy is an acknowledgment of mistakes made by Mrs. Clinton’s 2008 campaign, but also a recognition that she cannot simply run as the establishment candidate with inside-the-Beltway support." She has to get the young Democrats who were inspired by Obama. 

Ready for Hillary has merch for everyone, though. There's a baby onesie, for those who dreamed of a female president since they were in utero:

And some #cool buttons for teens. Valiant effort with "First Laddie," but let's keep working on that, shall we?

There's also this set of markers, for Tracy Flick.

While Ready for Hillary is still in the early stages, the super PAC has already added 1 million names to its email list. The group held its biggest fundraiser to date last week in L.A., where Hillary received a key endorsement from Omarosa (of The Apprentice fame). All in all, things are moving along. 

Of course, Hillary has not officially said whether or not she'll run in 2016. "I am not going to begin to think seriously about it until sometime next year," she said during an October speech. "I will think about it because it's something on a lot of people's minds. And it's on my mind as well."

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

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