Political face masks can be seen at Backstage on October 25, 2012 in Washington, DC. The store, which largely caters to theater productions, has one of its busy seasons in October as people rent and buy costumes for Halloween. AFP/Getty Images

Trick or Tweet

Walking into a Halloween party last year in D.C. was like taking a physical tour through the website Know Your Meme. "Binders full of women," fired Big Birds, Onion-style Joe Bidens, and "get at me, bro" Paul Ryans roamed the District on All Hallows' Eve. Washington loves a good (or bad) political costume. And it makes sense. The subject matter is salient, and fellow partygoers will actually get the joke. Crowdsourcing via Twitter, National Journal asked for suggestions about creative costumes for this year's season. Some of the responses included "Sad National Zoo kid (wear a monkey costume, spend all night outside crying at the door)"; "individual man-date"; "a DC Monument Barricade"; "Phil-a-Buster"; "Al Gored"; "The Platinum Coin"; "HealthCare.gov (take a really long time to respond to people)"; and our personal favorite: "Jay Carnage." Given the week the White House is having — thanks to the aforementioned HealthCare.gov — Jay Carney might want to go ahead and adopt that monicker himself.

Brian Resnick

Square to be Hip

There's always a bit of an unspoken contest for the hippest Republican member of Congress. Rep. Trey Radel may hold the current title. His multiple-tweet review of Jay-Z's album Magna Carta Holy Grail went viral. But the Floridian could soon have a rival. Taylor Griffin, an official in the Bush Treasury Department and a staffer for the late Sen. Jesse Helms, is running in the GOP primary in North Carolina against Rep. Walter Jones. If Griffin can get past Jones, and make it to Washington, his diverse musical tastes will likely take him to venues throughout the city. In the past couple of years, Griffin — one of the founding partners of D.C.'s Hamilton Place Strategies — has been spotted taking in Somali-Canadian rapper K'naan at the Rock & Roll Hotel on H Street and preppy staple Vampire Weekend at Merriweather Post Pavilion. He's keeping it up now that he's sold his stake in the firm and moved back down South. Earlier this fall, Griffin tweeted from the show back in his Eastern Carolina district by blues guitarists Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks. Griffin notes that he likes Carolina acts, such as now-defunct alt-country Whiskeytown and its lead singer, Ryan Adams, who hails from the district. "I gave him a tour of the White House once," Griffin told National Journal.

Matthew Cooper

Murmurs

In Order It's been so long since House members have done anything in a bipartisan way, they don't quite know how to handle it when it happens. Members of the House Rules Committee looked a little shocked this week when the chairman and ranking member of the House Transportation Committee sat before them, side-by-side, and presented the water-resources bill that they wrote together. "I'm going to say something earth-shattering. I appreciate the comments of the chairman," Rep. Nick Rahall of West Virginia, the top Democrat on the panel, said of his comrade-in-arms, Chairman Bill Shuster, R-Pa. Responded committee member Virginia Foxx, R-N.C., "It's very nice hearing this great love feast here on this bill. Very nice for a change." Even the Rules Committee staffers were bewildered at combing through 90 proposed amendments to pick 24 — from both Republicans and Democrats — for a floor vote. "We've never done this since I've been here," one aide said. The bipartisanship continued all the next day.

Trick or Tweet

Walking into a Halloween party last year in D.C. was like taking a physical tour through the website Know Your Meme. "Binders full of women," fired Big Birds, Onion-style Joe Bidens, and "get at me, bro" Paul Ryans roamed the District on All Hallows' Eve. Washington loves a good (or bad) political costume. And it makes sense. The subject matter is salient, and fellow partygoers will actually get the joke. Crowdsourcing via Twitter, National Journal asked for suggestions about creative costumes for this year's season. Some of the responses included "Sad National Zoo kid (wear a monkey costume, spend all night outside crying at the door)"; "individual man-date"; "a DC Monument Barricade"; "Phil-a-Buster"; "Al Gored"; "The Platinum Coin"; "HealthCare.gov (take a really long time to respond to people)"; and our personal favorite: "Jay Carnage." Given the week the White House is having — thanks to the aforementioned HealthCare.gov — Jay Carney might want to go ahead and adopt that monicker himself.

Brian Resnick

Square to be Hip

There's always a bit of an unspoken contest for the hippest Republican member of Congress. Rep. Trey Radel may hold the current title. His multiple-tweet review of Jay-Z's album Magna Carta Holy Grail went viral. But the Floridian could soon have a rival. Taylor Griffin, an official in the Bush Treasury Department and a staffer for the late Sen. Jesse Helms, is running in the GOP primary in North Carolina against Rep. Walter Jones. If Griffin can get past Jones, and make it to Washington, his diverse musical tastes will likely take him to venues throughout the city. In the past couple of years, Griffin — one of the founding partners of D.C.'s Hamilton Place Strategies — has been spotted taking in Somali-Canadian rapper K'naan at the Rock & Roll Hotel on H Street and preppy staple Vampire Weekend at Merriweather Post Pavilion. He's keeping it up now that he's sold his stake in the firm and moved back down South. Earlier this fall, Griffin tweeted from the show back in his Eastern Carolina district by blues guitarists Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks. Griffin notes that he likes Carolina acts, such as now-defunct alt-country Whiskeytown and its lead singer, Ryan Adams, who hails from the district. "I gave him a tour of the White House once," Griffin told National Journal.

Matthew Cooper

Murmurs

In Order It's been so long since House members have done anything in a bipartisan way, they don't quite know how to handle it when it happens. Members of the House Rules Committee looked a little shocked this week when the chairman and ranking member of the House Transportation Committee sat before them, side-by-side, and presented the water-resources bill that they wrote together. "I'm going to say something earth-shattering. I appreciate the comments of the chairman," Rep. Nick Rahall of West Virginia, the top Democrat on the panel, said of his comrade-in-arms, Chairman Bill Shuster, R-Pa. Responded committee member Virginia Foxx, R-N.C., "It's very nice hearing this great love feast here on this bill. Very nice for a change." Even the Rules Committee staffers were bewildered at combing through 90 proposed amendments to pick 24 — from both Republicans and Democrats — for a floor vote. "We've never done this since I've been here," one aide said. The bipartisanship continued all the next day.

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