Patrons at Bullfeathers Restaurant watch from the bar as US President Barack Obama (rear) addresses the nation on Syria in a live televised speech on September 10, 2013 in Washington, DC. Bullfeathers is named after US President Teddy Roosevelt. AFP/Getty Images

I'll Have Another

The shutdown left furloughed government employees and stressed congressional staffers with too much time on their hands. What did they do? Drink, apparently. This week, Mayor Vincent Gray listed the shutdown's economic impact on the District of Columbia. Here are some of the numbers.

Daily, $217 million lost from federal and contractor wages in the metro area that have either been deferred or canceled; a $44 million hit per week to the District's economic activity; $6 million less in tax revenue per week; a 7 percent drop in restaurant traffic in the first week of October, compared with 2012; 13,000 fewer hotel bookings that same week, amounting to an 8.3 percent decline (or $2 million ) from 2012.

The mayor's office is still finalizing numbers on the spike in alcohol-tax revenue. The District did confirm, however, a 3 percent increase in restaurant beverage sales (which are primarily liquor) during the first week of October compared with the first week of September.

Matt Vasilogambros

Rebuke

Louisiana Republican Charles Boustany this week questioned the political allegiances and motivations of his tea-party-aligned colleagues and declared they had put the GOP's House majority at risk. "There are members with a different agenda," he said Wednesday in an interview. "And I'm not sure they're Republicans, and I'm not sure they're conservative." Boustany's comments came a day after rank-and-file House Republicans rejected a package to reopen the government authored by their leader. "The speaker has said consistently unless we can put 218 votes up, and preferably more than that, our ability to negotiate is pretty much undermined, and that's the problem we've repeatedly found ourselves in," said Boustany, a member of the Ways and Means Committee who has served since 2005. "Look at payroll tax. Look at fiscal cliff. You can go on and on." He decried his party's inability to rule the chamber. "This could trigger a wave of discontent that could wash out our Republican majority in the House if we're not careful."

Shane Goldmacher


Murmurs

Talking Point It's October, and that means a true baseball fan can't really put the playoffs out of his mind, even if he is a top White House official trying to grapple with a genuine threat to the stability of the U.S. economy. That was clear when press secretary Jay Carney got a little tongue-tied at his briefing Wednesday. "I'm not sure that was a great sentence," Carney said self-deprecatingly. "I apologize. You understand what I'm trying to say." He then laughed and added, "The Red Sox game wasn't even late, so I can't blame that." And true Sox fanatic that he is, Carney couldn't help but interject, "But since I'm speaking about the Red Sox, how about John Lackey, huh? Pretty good." When no reporter bit, he somewhat sadly said, "Moving on "¦"

Pop Psych "Don't be depressed. The tide is turning." That was Rep. Earl Blumenauer, a Democrat and eternal optimist from the liberal heartland of Portland, Ore., reacting to glum assessments earlier in the week from journalists and staffers alike who, mistakenly, saw no way out of the never-ending fiscal standoff in the Capitol. Even as each new idea from House Speaker John Boehner went down in flames, Blumenauer was having none of the gloom. But, then again, this is the guy who says the television parody of his hometown, Portlandia, is more reality-based than people think.

I'll Have Another

The shutdown left furloughed government employees and stressed congressional staffers with too much time on their hands. What did they do? Drink, apparently. This week, Mayor Vincent Gray listed the shutdown's economic impact on the District of Columbia. Here are some of the numbers.

Daily, $217 million lost from federal and contractor wages in the metro area that have either been deferred or canceled; a $44 million hit per week to the District's economic activity; $6 million less in tax revenue per week; a 7 percent drop in restaurant traffic in the first week of October, compared with 2012; 13,000 fewer hotel bookings that same week, amounting to an 8.3 percent decline (or $2 million ) from 2012.

The mayor's office is still finalizing numbers on the spike in alcohol-tax revenue. The District did confirm, however, a 3 percent increase in restaurant beverage sales (which are primarily liquor) during the first week of October compared with the first week of September.

Matt Vasilogambros

Rebuke

Louisiana Republican Charles Boustany this week questioned the political allegiances and motivations of his tea-party-aligned colleagues and declared they had put the GOP's House majority at risk. "There are members with a different agenda," he said Wednesday in an interview. "And I'm not sure they're Republicans, and I'm not sure they're conservative." Boustany's comments came a day after rank-and-file House Republicans rejected a package to reopen the government authored by their leader. "The speaker has said consistently unless we can put 218 votes up, and preferably more than that, our ability to negotiate is pretty much undermined, and that's the problem we've repeatedly found ourselves in," said Boustany, a member of the Ways and Means Committee who has served since 2005. "Look at payroll tax. Look at fiscal cliff. You can go on and on." He decried his party's inability to rule the chamber. "This could trigger a wave of discontent that could wash out our Republican majority in the House if we're not careful."

Shane Goldmacher


Murmurs

Talking Point It's October, and that means a true baseball fan can't really put the playoffs out of his mind, even if he is a top White House official trying to grapple with a genuine threat to the stability of the U.S. economy. That was clear when press secretary Jay Carney got a little tongue-tied at his briefing Wednesday. "I'm not sure that was a great sentence," Carney said self-deprecatingly. "I apologize. You understand what I'm trying to say." He then laughed and added, "The Red Sox game wasn't even late, so I can't blame that." And true Sox fanatic that he is, Carney couldn't help but interject, "But since I'm speaking about the Red Sox, how about John Lackey, huh? Pretty good." When no reporter bit, he somewhat sadly said, "Moving on "¦"

Pop Psych "Don't be depressed. The tide is turning." That was Rep. Earl Blumenauer, a Democrat and eternal optimist from the liberal heartland of Portland, Ore., reacting to glum assessments earlier in the week from journalists and staffers alike who, mistakenly, saw no way out of the never-ending fiscal standoff in the Capitol. Even as each new idea from House Speaker John Boehner went down in flames, Blumenauer was having none of the gloom. But, then again, this is the guy who says the television parody of his hometown, Portlandia, is more reality-based than people think.

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