Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, who is leading a U.S. Congressional delegation to the Russian Federation speaks during a news conference in U.S. Embassy in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, June 2, 2013. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, a California Republican who led the six-person delegation this week, said at a press conference Sunday that there was “nothing specific” that could have helped April’s bombings, but that the U.S. and Russia needed to work more closely on joint security threats. AP2013

Antisocial Media

After midnight, long after his wife and kids have gone to bed, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher can often be found hunched over his iPad, tapping out a message on Twitter. Sometimes he's calling President Obama a fascist or accusing "liberal racists" of muddying public policy with consideration of skin color. Other times he's squabbling with global-warming "alarmists." Rohrabacher has dived into the back-and-forth fray of debating anonymous Twitter users. His habits make the conservative Republican from Orange County, Calif., either the country's most responsive social-media member of Congress or an argument-junkie in need of a quick, online fix. He has penned more than 6,000 tweets, but unlike most lawmakers, who seek a wide audience for their thoughts, Rohrabacher aims the vast majority of his micro-missives at particular followers, engaging in days-long, meandering debates that are a mix of name-calling and policy disputes. He's at it at all hours. "You're there doing it sitting in the middle of your house, waiting for everybody, getting ready for the clock to strike 12 in order to start the New Year's celebration," he says. That is not an exaggeration. He was tweeting throughout the last New Year's Eve. His wife, and staff, would just as soon he cut himself off. "She has to grab me by the arm and say, "˜Come on now, get out the door and get the kids to church,' " says Rohrabacher, who is the father of 9-year-old triplets.

Shane Goldmacher

Artful Dodge

As the diplomatic dance this week at the United Nations demonstrated anew, foreign leaders can't even casually bump into each other at a meeting without elaborate preplanning. Nobody ever thought President Obama and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani would hold any substantive talks while both were in New York City. But some had hoped they would meet and shake hands. Administration officials, though, said that was "too complicated" for the Iranians. So there was no handshake, even though both men were in the same building.

That might be good for Obama, though. Conservatives are still upset that he shook hands with Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez at a summit in 2009. And conservatives were similarly irked when President Bush shook hands with Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega in 1989. But Bush gave a lesson to future presidents on how to neutralize such criticism: Although he shook hands with Ortega, he very showily kissed the leader of the Nicaraguan opposition. And, even in diplomacy, a kiss always trumps a handshake.

George E. Condon Jr.

Murmurs

Scarlet L Lobbyists are hard to trust. In 2008, 64 percent of respondents to a Gallup Poll gave them a "very low" or "low" rating when asked to assess their honesty and ethics. That stands tied with one other cohort as the lowest rating ever. Perhaps that's why the American League of Lobbyists wants to change its name. "When I say what I do, people often say, 'How can you do that, working for those people?' " said Monte Ward, the league president. "Once I educate them that there are lobbyists on all sides, doing all types of work, they are much more accepting." They're government-relations professionals, he says. But even that might not be all that popular. The other group to score so low on Gallup's honesty poll: members of Congress.

Status Update OK, so it wasn't officially a filibuster. But that didn't stop the Internet from having fun. Shortly after Sen. Ted Cruz began his 21-hour exercise,  the Web birthed a bluntly christened Tumblr site: istedcruzfilibustering.com. At first, the page answered its own question with a rather diffident answer: "KINDA." Later on, the site offered another rejoinder: "YES "¦ Basically. Well, maybe not technically. But what's the difference," before taking a foul-mouthed turn that we can't reprint. After Cruz finished, the site simply declared "NO." So who's behind the funnies? Kyle Tibbitts, a California-based entrepreneur and onetime congressional House page.

Antisocial Media

After midnight, long after his wife and kids have gone to bed, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher can often be found hunched over his iPad, tapping out a message on Twitter. Sometimes he's calling President Obama a fascist or accusing "liberal racists" of muddying public policy with consideration of skin color. Other times he's squabbling with global-warming "alarmists." Rohrabacher has dived into the back-and-forth fray of debating anonymous Twitter users. His habits make the conservative Republican from Orange County, Calif., either the country's most responsive social-media member of Congress or an argument-junkie in need of a quick, online fix. He has penned more than 6,000 tweets, but unlike most lawmakers, who seek a wide audience for their thoughts, Rohrabacher aims the vast majority of his micro-missives at particular followers, engaging in days-long, meandering debates that are a mix of name-calling and policy disputes. He's at it at all hours. "You're there doing it sitting in the middle of your house, waiting for everybody, getting ready for the clock to strike 12 in order to start the New Year's celebration," he says. That is not an exaggeration. He was tweeting throughout the last New Year's Eve. His wife, and staff, would just as soon he cut himself off. "She has to grab me by the arm and say, "˜Come on now, get out the door and get the kids to church,' " says Rohrabacher, who is the father of 9-year-old triplets.

Shane Goldmacher

Artful Dodge

As the diplomatic dance this week at the United Nations demonstrated anew, foreign leaders can't even casually bump into each other at a meeting without elaborate preplanning. Nobody ever thought President Obama and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani would hold any substantive talks while both were in New York City. But some had hoped they would meet and shake hands. Administration officials, though, said that was "too complicated" for the Iranians. So there was no handshake, even though both men were in the same building.

That might be good for Obama, though. Conservatives are still upset that he shook hands with Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez at a summit in 2009. And conservatives were similarly irked when President Bush shook hands with Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega in 1989. But Bush gave a lesson to future presidents on how to neutralize such criticism: Although he shook hands with Ortega, he very showily kissed the leader of the Nicaraguan opposition. And, even in diplomacy, a kiss always trumps a handshake.

George E. Condon Jr.

Murmurs

Scarlet L Lobbyists are hard to trust. In 2008, 64 percent of respondents to a Gallup Poll gave them a "very low" or "low" rating when asked to assess their honesty and ethics. That stands tied with one other cohort as the lowest rating ever. Perhaps that's why the American League of Lobbyists wants to change its name. "When I say what I do, people often say, 'How can you do that, working for those people?' " said Monte Ward, the league president. "Once I educate them that there are lobbyists on all sides, doing all types of work, they are much more accepting." They're government-relations professionals, he says. But even that might not be all that popular. The other group to score so low on Gallup's honesty poll: members of Congress.

Status Update OK, so it wasn't officially a filibuster. But that didn't stop the Internet from having fun. Shortly after Sen. Ted Cruz began his 21-hour exercise,  the Web birthed a bluntly christened Tumblr site: istedcruzfilibustering.com. At first, the page answered its own question with a rather diffident answer: "KINDA." Later on, the site offered another rejoinder: "YES "¦ Basically. Well, maybe not technically. But what's the difference," before taking a foul-mouthed turn that we can't reprint. After Cruz finished, the site simply declared "NO." So who's behind the funnies? Kyle Tibbitts, a California-based entrepreneur and onetime congressional House page.

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