He's been called "the governor of D.C.," "a D.C. power player under fire," and "public menace No. 1," but now it appears local businessman Jeffrey Thompson has moved beyond the typical District government corruption arena and entered the national playing field.

Newly released court documents link Thompson, who's long been a central figure in the federal investigation of D.C. corruption, to Hillary Rodham Clinton's 2008 presidential campaign.

From The Washington Post:

Jeffrey E. Thompson, a former city contractor who allegedly financed a secret campaign for then-mayoral candidate Vincent C. Gray (D) in 2010, financed an independent effort to reach urban voters on behalf of Clinton in Texas and at least three other states during the 2008 Democratic primaries, according to the interviews and documents.

Thompson allegedly paid Troy White, a New York marketing executive, more than $608,000 to hire "street teams" to distribute posters, stickers, and yard signs beginning in February 2008 to help raise Clinton's profile during her primary battle with then-Sen. Barack Obama, according to the documents and interviews with several people familiar with the investigation.

The accusations came to light after White pled guilty to one misdemeanor count of failing to file corporate income taxes over a four year period, which included the 2008 Democratic presidential primary.

Add to the mix the fact that there's no evidence these men disclosed any of their alleged expenditures to the Federal Election Commission, as required under campaign finance law, and you have allegations that sound a whole lot like the allegations surrounding Gray's mayoral campaign.

A D.C. corruption scandals primer published by the Post — yes, such a thing is necessary — shows that since 2012, three D.C. Council members have pled guilty to federal corruption charges and federal prosecutors have probed Vincent Gray's 2010 campaign on multiple fronts.

Jeffrey Thompson may have graduated from D.C. corruption to the next league!

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