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Let no one ever intimate that we Americans can't be as flippant about threats to bomb things as Kim Jong-un. As North Korea ratchets its rhetoric to a 732 (on a 2,500-point scale), Senator Jim Inhofe and the Buffalo Bills' Stevie Johnson got in on the act, too.

Speaking to NewsMax (of course), Inhofe, the senior senator from Oklahoma, presented his case.

The guy that runs that show up there [Ed. Note: that would be Kim Jong-Un] is just as bad as his daddy was. He's not reliable in terms of what he might do and what he might say. … I think he's deranged.

Fair critique. Who would just willy-nilly threaten to bomb another country? Clear sign of derangement. Inhofe continued.

I think we should prepared to do [a pre-emptive strike] right now. We do have … capability out there right now with the F-22s and the battleships. And I think something of a preemptive strike, something like that, would get their attention.

Yes, it probably would. Whether or not Inhofe was standing in front of a large map covered with lines pointing at North Korea is unknown.

Meanwhile, Stevie Johnson of the Buffalo Bills offered a more sober take.

Foxboro, Massachusetts, is the capital city of another disturbing empire: the New England Patriots. Johnson perhaps hates the Patriots because the Pats have won 63 of the 104 times the two teams have played.

Johnson sort of apologized later.

It's not a great plan anyway. Very few of the Patriots actually live in Foxboro. But at least Johnson was only suggesting that about 17,000 people be killed. Pyongyang has 147 times as many people.

Speaking of talking about bombing things, CNN busted out its holograms to imagine what a war in the Koreas might look like. (It has previously used the technology for other important issues, like Will.I.Am and goats.) If you don't want to watch the video, it mostly involves arrows pointing from North to South. But, you know, in 3D.

Results of the Rationality Olympics are in: Johnson and CNN tie for silver, Inhofe takes home the bronze. There was no first-place winner.

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