Sen. Bob Corker in his Washington D.C. office.National Journal

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

There was no love lost in the 2010 partisan battle over the Dodd-Frank financial-reform law — and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, in particular. But the debate managed to forge at least one unexpected relationship across party lines — between Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., who tried to craft a compromise on the bureau, and freshman Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., who was then lobbying for the agency. Now that she's in the Senate, Warren is relying on Corker to help show her the ropes. On the campaign trail, she showed interest in working with him on reforming housing finance. After Warren won, Corker called to talk about Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and the first legislation she signed on to was a Fannie/Freddie reform bill he was leading. She then chose him to be her GOP mentor. "I'll be candid; I was flattered that her first bill that she decided to be a lead cosponsor on was one that we crafted," he told National Journal. Corker said the two have dined together twice. Given their shared enthusiasm for the Banking Committee, he said, he hopes they can collaborate on other issues.

Stacy Kaper


Forgive Us Our Trespasses

The special election in South Carolina's 1st Congressional District between Republican Mark Sanford and Democrat Elizabeth Colbert Busch took a bizarre turn this week, after Sanford acknowledged he trespassed on his former wife's property, prompting her to file a court complaint. In a statement, Sanford said he entered his ex-wife's home so his 14-year-old son wouldn't have to watch the Super Bowl alone. That misstep was enough for the National Republican Congressional Committee to announce it wouldn't be spending money on Sanford's behalf, putting his prospects in further jeopardy. The revelations came the same week Sanford released his first ad of the general election, a tough spot denouncing Colbert Busch's close ties to labor unions. It is his first attack ad; all the TV spots in the primary were positive and biographical. The decision to go negative suggests a close race. Democratic strategists believe Sanford runs poorly with Republican women, giving the party a real opportunity for an upset.

Josh Kraushaar


Murmurs

Late Arrival They were just about the worst-kept secret in Washington: a bipartisan group of eight House members writing an immigration-reform proposal behind closed doors. But after the Senate beat them to releasing a bill, the members decided the jig was up and outed themselves. In a statement signed by Reps. Xavier Becerra, D-Calif.; John Carter, R-Texas; Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla.; Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill.; Sam Johnson, R-Texas; Raul Labrador, R-Idaho; Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif.; and John Yarmuth, D-Ky., the group said it would soon provide its plan. If the eight hope to shape the debate, however, they need to produce more than a promise. The Senate isn't waiting.

Word War Too In the aftermath of the Senate votes Wednesday on the Manchin-Toomey gun bill, members of Congress took to Twitter to tout their votes or air their outrage. "Cowardice on the Senate floor today," snapped Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn. Sen. Mark Kirk of Illinois, one of the few Republicans to support the legislation, said he was "disappointed" but "voters will be the ultimate judge." Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, defended her no vote, saying the bill would have required "thousands of law-abiding Alaskans" to fly to the Lower 48 to buy a gun. Others were high-fiving. "The day our gov't limits your 2nd amend right is the day they limit your first amendment of FREE SPEECH," tweeted freshman Rep. Trey Radel of Florida.

Forgive Us Our Trespasses

The special election in South Carolina's 1st Congressional District between Republican Mark Sanford and Democrat Elizabeth Colbert Busch took a bizarre turn this week, after Sanford acknowledged he trespassed on his former wife's property, prompting her to file a court complaint. In a statement, Sanford said he entered his ex-wife's home so his 14-year-old son wouldn't have to watch the Super Bowl alone. That misstep was enough for the National Republican Congressional Committee to announce it wouldn't be spending money on Sanford's behalf, putting his prospects in further jeopardy. The revelations came the same week Sanford released his first ad of the general election, a tough spot denouncing Colbert Busch's close ties to labor unions. It is his first attack ad; all the TV spots in the primary were positive and biographical. The decision to go negative suggests a close race. Democratic strategists believe Sanford runs poorly with Republican women, giving the party a real opportunity for an upset.

Josh Kraushaar


Murmurs

Late Arrival They were just about the worst-kept secret in Washington: a bipartisan group of eight House members writing an immigration-reform proposal behind closed doors. But after the Senate beat them to releasing a bill, the members decided the jig was up and outed themselves. In a statement signed by Reps. Xavier Becerra, D-Calif.; John Carter, R-Texas; Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla.; Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill.; Sam Johnson, R-Texas; Raul Labrador, R-Idaho; Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif.; and John Yarmuth, D-Ky., the group said it would soon provide its plan. If the eight hope to shape the debate, however, they need to produce more than a promise. The Senate isn't waiting.

Word War Too In the aftermath of the Senate votes Wednesday on the Manchin-Toomey gun bill, members of Congress took to Twitter to tout their votes or air their outrage. "Cowardice on the Senate floor today," snapped Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn. Sen. Mark Kirk of Illinois, one of the few Republicans to support the legislation, said he was "disappointed" but "voters will be the ultimate judge." Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, defended her no vote, saying the bill would have required "thousands of law-abiding Alaskans" to fly to the Lower 48 to buy a gun. Others were high-fiving. "The day our gov't limits your 2nd amend right is the day they limit your first amendment of FREE SPEECH," tweeted freshman Rep. Trey Radel of Florida.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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