Me with a monk that I sponsor as part of a program "sponsor a monk" in which you help with their tuition and food as a contribution to help in their education he is Tenzin Sherab who studies at Sarah College we are in front of the prayer wheels at the main temple which has the residence of His Holiness Dalai Lama on the grounds of the temple. These monks by the time they are done are masters in meditation. (Tsering Choney Photography) Tsering Choney Photography

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

No Love Lost

For a man who says he has found inner peace through meditation and study under the Dalai Lama, former Rep. Bob Ney of Ohio has an awful lot of anger. The once-powerful House chairman, who was forced out of office by scandal in 2006 and spent 11 months in federal prison, has given voice to that anger in a memoir. The book's 377 pages are packed with criticisms of some of Washington's biggest names of the past two decades.

Ney's most dramatic accusations are against fellow Ohioan John Boehner, the man he once saw as his biggest rival for the House speakership. He describes Boehner as "a bit lazy" and "a man who was all about winning and money. He was a chain-smoking, relentless wine drinker who was more interested in the high life — golf, women, cigarettes, fun, and alcohol." Boehner "spent almost all of his time on fundraising, not policy," Ney writes. He "golfed, drank constantly, and took the easy way legislatively." Ney recalls Boehner handing out checks on the House floor and says his ties to a tobacco company were so tight that lawmakers could get free cigarettes from his office.

Boehner's office has called the accusations "baseless" and suggested Ney is just trying to sell books.

George E. Condon Jr.


Family Ties

The talk in South Dakota is that Democratic Sen. Tim Johnson is considering retirement, and that his son Brendan may attempt to keep the seat in the family. But the younger Johnson, South Dakota's U.S. attorney, will have to beat back the impression of a handoff from his father, a potential liability in a conservative state that Republicans are aggressively contesting. Still, his name is being circulated as a possible candidate, along with former Democratic Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin, to run against former GOP Gov. Mike Rounds, if Tim Johnson retires. The elder Johnson suffered a brain hemorrhage in 2006 and has said he will wait until spring to make an announcement about whether he'll run in 2014. If he steps down, the younger Johnson won't be a shoo-in for the nomination. Herseth Sandlin, who served in the House for seven years, hails from another well-known South Dakota political family.

Elahe Izadi


MURMURS

Day Job Ashley Judd can't get enough of the nation's capital. The actress, whose recent trip to Washington added to speculation that she'll challenge Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell next year, plays first lady Margaret Asher in the upcoming film Olympus Has Fallen. The movie tells the story of North Korean terrorists taking over the White House and kidnapping President Benjamin Asher (Aaron Eckhart). Whether Judd will make the Senate run remains to be seen, but it's safe to say she won't be FLOTUS anytime soon — her husband is Scottish, and they're getting divorced. 

Microscope President Obama put the usually staid Jefferson Hotel in the unwelcome limelight Wednesday evening as limos, reporters, and camera crews staked out his private dinner with Republican senators. Sometimes referred to as "White House North," the Jefferson has long kept a low profile. Barbra Streisand stayed there when she had business with President Clinton. Former Clinton political adviser Dick Morris reportedly had frequent trysts at the hotel with a call girl before he resigned his White House post. "Celebrities want to stay where they can stay quiet," Pierre Estoppey, who managed the hotel from 1991 to 1994, once told The New York Times. So let's not make this a regular thing, Mr. President.

No Love Lost

For a man who says he has found inner peace through meditation and study under the Dalai Lama, former Rep. Bob Ney of Ohio has an awful lot of anger. The once-powerful House chairman, who was forced out of office by scandal in 2006 and spent 11 months in federal prison, has given voice to that anger in a memoir. The book's 377 pages are packed with criticisms of some of Washington's biggest names of the past two decades.

Ney's most dramatic accusations are against fellow Ohioan John Boehner, the man he once saw as his biggest rival for the House speakership. He describes Boehner as "a bit lazy" and "a man who was all about winning and money. He was a chain-smoking, relentless wine drinker who was more interested in the high life — golf, women, cigarettes, fun, and alcohol." Boehner "spent almost all of his time on fundraising, not policy," Ney writes. He "golfed, drank constantly, and took the easy way legislatively." Ney recalls Boehner handing out checks on the House floor and says his ties to a tobacco company were so tight that lawmakers could get free cigarettes from his office.

Boehner's office has called the accusations "baseless" and suggested Ney is just trying to sell books.

George E. Condon Jr.


Family Ties

The talk in South Dakota is that Democratic Sen. Tim Johnson is considering retirement, and that his son Brendan may attempt to keep the seat in the family. But the younger Johnson, South Dakota's U.S. attorney, will have to beat back the impression of a handoff from his father, a potential liability in a conservative state that Republicans are aggressively contesting. Still, his name is being circulated as a possible candidate, along with former Democratic Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin, to run against former GOP Gov. Mike Rounds, if Tim Johnson retires. The elder Johnson suffered a brain hemorrhage in 2006 and has said he will wait until spring to make an announcement about whether he'll run in 2014. If he steps down, the younger Johnson won't be a shoo-in for the nomination. Herseth Sandlin, who served in the House for seven years, hails from another well-known South Dakota political family.

Elahe Izadi


MURMURS

Day Job Ashley Judd can't get enough of the nation's capital. The actress, whose recent trip to Washington added to speculation that she'll challenge Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell next year, plays first lady Margaret Asher in the upcoming film Olympus Has Fallen. The movie tells the story of North Korean terrorists taking over the White House and kidnapping President Benjamin Asher (Aaron Eckhart). Whether Judd will make the Senate run remains to be seen, but it's safe to say she won't be FLOTUS anytime soon — her husband is Scottish, and they're getting divorced. 

Microscope President Obama put the usually staid Jefferson Hotel in the unwelcome limelight Wednesday evening as limos, reporters, and camera crews staked out his private dinner with Republican senators. Sometimes referred to as "White House North," the Jefferson has long kept a low profile. Barbra Streisand stayed there when she had business with President Clinton. Former Clinton political adviser Dick Morris reportedly had frequent trysts at the hotel with a call girl before he resigned his White House post. "Celebrities want to stay where they can stay quiet," Pierre Estoppey, who managed the hotel from 1991 to 1994, once told The New York Times. So let's not make this a regular thing, Mr. President.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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