Illegal immigrant Layios Roberto waits outside the offices of Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights in Los Angeles Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012. Hundreds of thousands of young illegal immigrants scrambled to get papers in order, as the U.S. started accepting applications to allow them to avoid deportation and get a work permit, but not a path to citizenship. President Barack Obama announced the program in June after pressure from Hispanic voters and others who said he hasn't fulfilled a campaign promise to overhaul tangled U.S. immigration laws. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)National Journal

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The Pew Research Center released a 130-page report Thursday titled "Second-Generation Americans: A Portrait of the Adult Children of Immigrants" (pdf).


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In coming days we'll delve deeper into the report, but here's the topline statistic that shapes our future as a melting-pot nation, looking two generations out:

93% 

of the growth of the U.S. working-age population by 2050
will be immigrants and their U.S.-born children. 

"Immigrant stock," the report says of first- and second-generation combined, may grow by more than 47 percent, from 76 million to 160 million in a little more than 35 years.

Beyond that astounding number, the research delves into attitudes about identity, economics, interactions, success, and politics.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

This article is part of our Next America: Communities project, which is supported by a grant from Emerson Collective.

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