This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

Comprehensive immigration reform. It's the buzz phrase that won't ever go away, and the one policy item that many expect to be at the top of President Obama's second-term agenda.

It also appears that the American public is warming up to the idea, according to a new Associated Press-GfK poll. More than 6 in 10 Americans now say they're open to a path of citizenship for illegal immigrants. In 2010, just 50 percent said the same thing.

62%
of Americans favor
a path to citizenship
for illegal immigrants.

In contrast, 35 percent of Americans opposed the policy, compared with 48 percent who were opposed to it in 2010.

"We act as if our grandparents got here legally. Don't want to ask a single Indian about that," one poll respondent told the AP. "I don't think that most of us can solidly come to a point where our grandparents or great-grandparents or great-great-grandparents were here legally. What does that even mean?"

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

This article is part of our Next America: Communities project, which is supported by a grant from Emerson Collective.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.