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Susan Rice met with the triumvirate of Senators John McCain, Lindsey Graham, and Kelly Ayotte in a closed-door meeting today. And the first few "disturbed" things we're hearing from those senators sound awfully familiar: They're threatening to block her potential nomination as Secretary of State... again. Mind you, the Rice-McCain-Graham-Ayotte meeting was behind closed doors, so any stuff that we find out from the meeting will be coming from the lips and teams of these people. So far, Graham, Ayotte and McCain haven't changed their tune from their ever-shifting critique of Rice's talking points.

Luke Russert has this comment from Sen. Graham who get to say he's disturbed without really elucidating on what it is that disturbed him so greatly: 

From Russert's reporting, it looks like Graham is sticking to his familiar talking point—that there was, what he believed to be, bad information given out: 

And here's video of Graham's comments about being very clear about his being more disturbed, but not-so-clear idea of what did that:

If you made it through the video, you'll see Graham harp on "bad information" given, and then prescribe the solution of not giving any information at all. 

Sen. Ayotte threatening (again) to block the nomination: 

And MSNBC reported that John McCain, who has spearheaded the nomination-blocking initiative, has issued a similar threat. 

So what sense can we make out of these three angry senators? Well, it means that Obama's frontrunner for Secretary of State isn't any better off than she was a few weeks ago when said Senators were still angry. And they're still pushing this idea even though a CNN poll released this morning found that the majority of Americans are unsatisfied with the White House response to Benghazi, but don't believe there's a cover-up—which this troika of Senators are claiming. "Fifty-four percent think those inaccurate statements reflected what the White House believed to be true at the time," reads the CNN poll result. 

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