A fire fighter surveys the smoldering ruins of a house in the Breezy Point section of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. More than 50 homes were destroyed in a fire which swept through the oceanfront community during superstorm Sandy. AP

NO HOUSE, NO HOME

No question about it: 2012 has been a very bad year for Rep. Bob Turner. A Republican, Turner made headlines in 2011 when he succeeded former Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., after his "sexting" scandal. But the state lost two seats in redistricting, and Albany mapmakers decided one of them would be Turner's. Left with nowhere to run, Turner decided he would try to unseat Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand. No dice. Turner lost the June primary to Manhattan lawyer Wendy Long. But the worst was yet to come. This week, his home in the Breezy Point section of Queens burned down during Hurricane Sandy. Fire ravaged the beachfront community even though nearly 200 firefighters battled the blaze for more than nine hours. Turner handled the tragedy with class, thanking the "men and women who put their lives on the line" and pronouncing his gratitude "that my family and I are safe after this destructive storm." In Sandy's aftermath, he pledged to work to ensure that residents had access to needed services.

Shane Goldmacher

BIDEN IS SECOND IN COMMAND BUT FIRST IN FLIRTING

No one flirts with voters with quite the relish that Joe Biden brings to the task. Just last week, the vice president lingered in the lobby of a Hampton Inn in Springfield, Ohio, insisting on giving out candy to surprised guests. The next day, while having breakfast at a small country restaurant, he rewarded one woman with a bear hug after she said he looked slim. In Manchester, N.H., there was another hug for a young woman. "I want the record to show: She's under 50," Biden told reporters. "They say the only women that ever want to hug me are over 50." Two days later, there was more flirting, in Sarasota, Fla. At a meeting with campaign volunteers, he told one woman she had "a smile that lights up the whole headquarters" while he introduced another as "my new girlfriend." Amid the flirting, Biden signaled that he is already looking forward to the next campaign. In Sarasota, he was besieged by elderly women professing their love for him, one of whom confessed she had a Republican brother. Biden ordered her to get him on the phone, and the VP had a serious discussion with the man about health care. "When your insurance rates go down, then you'll vote for me in 2016," Biden predicted.

George E. Condon Jr.

MURMURS

Air War Good news for political reporters on a budget: Ground zero in the battle for the White House is in your backyard. President Obama, Mitt Romney, and the outside groups advertising on their behalf have spent more money in the Washington media market than anywhere else in the country, according to a review of ad-spending figures. All told, the two sides have spent $74.5 million on cable, broadcast, and radio ads aimed at reaching swing voters in Northern Virginia. For the first time in history, the two sides fighting for the White House have spent more than $1 billion on television and radio advertising, the data show. Romney and Republican outside groups have dumped a combined $605 million into airtime since the beginning of the general election, while Obama and his Democratic allies have spent $452 million.

How to Run For a sense of why House Republicans are a near-lock to hang onto their majority, take a look at three once-inviting targets representing battleground districts: freshman Reps. Sean Duffy, R-Wis., Mike Fitzpatrick, R-Pa., and Allen West, R-Fla. House GOP strategists expect all threeto win a second term because they've been assiduous in building their own brands back home. They've turned their biographies into assets, which has insulated them from the volatile presidential campaign.

This article appeared in print as "Inside Washington: November 3, 2012."

NO HOUSE, NO HOME

No question about it: 2012 has been a very bad year for Rep. Bob Turner. A Republican, Turner made headlines in 2011 when he succeeded former Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., after his "sexting" scandal. But the state lost two seats in redistricting, and Albany mapmakers decided one of them would be Turner's. Left with nowhere to run, Turner decided he would try to unseat Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand. No dice. Turner lost the June primary to Manhattan lawyer Wendy Long. But the worst was yet to come. This week, his home in the Breezy Point section of Queens burned down during Hurricane Sandy. Fire ravaged the beachfront community even though nearly 200 firefighters battled the blaze for more than nine hours. Turner handled the tragedy with class, thanking the "men and women who put their lives on the line" and pronouncing his gratitude "that my family and I are safe after this destructive storm." In Sandy's aftermath, he pledged to work to ensure that residents had access to needed services.

Shane Goldmacher

BIDEN IS SECOND IN COMMAND BUT FIRST IN FLIRTING

No one flirts with voters with quite the relish that Joe Biden brings to the task. Just last week, the vice president lingered in the lobby of a Hampton Inn in Springfield, Ohio, insisting on giving out candy to surprised guests. The next day, while having breakfast at a small country restaurant, he rewarded one woman with a bear hug after she said he looked slim. In Manchester, N.H., there was another hug for a young woman. "I want the record to show: She's under 50," Biden told reporters. "They say the only women that ever want to hug me are over 50." Two days later, there was more flirting, in Sarasota, Fla. At a meeting with campaign volunteers, he told one woman she had "a smile that lights up the whole headquarters" while he introduced another as "my new girlfriend." Amid the flirting, Biden signaled that he is already looking forward to the next campaign. In Sarasota, he was besieged by elderly women professing their love for him, one of whom confessed she had a Republican brother. Biden ordered her to get him on the phone, and the VP had a serious discussion with the man about health care. "When your insurance rates go down, then you'll vote for me in 2016," Biden predicted.

George E. Condon Jr.

MURMURS

Air War Good news for political reporters on a budget: Ground zero in the battle for the White House is in your backyard. President Obama, Mitt Romney, and the outside groups advertising on their behalf have spent more money in the Washington media market than anywhere else in the country, according to a review of ad-spending figures. All told, the two sides have spent $74.5 million on cable, broadcast, and radio ads aimed at reaching swing voters in Northern Virginia. For the first time in history, the two sides fighting for the White House have spent more than $1 billion on television and radio advertising, the data show. Romney and Republican outside groups have dumped a combined $605 million into airtime since the beginning of the general election, while Obama and his Democratic allies have spent $452 million.

How to Run For a sense of why House Republicans are a near-lock to hang onto their majority, take a look at three once-inviting targets representing battleground districts: freshman Reps. Sean Duffy, R-Wis., Mike Fitzpatrick, R-Pa., and Allen West, R-Fla. House GOP strategists expect all threeto win a second term because they've been assiduous in building their own brands back home. They've turned their biographies into assets, which has insulated them from the volatile presidential campaign.

This article appeared in print as "Inside Washington: November 3, 2012."

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.