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Summer is now a distant memory, and the presidential campaigns have moved from sweating through parades to engaging in wholesome fall festivities to convince the plebes they are Just Like Us. President Obama doesn't have many festive photographs in the wire archives—he's always doing rallies (bad photo ops!) instead—but Mitt Romney's campaign has made sure its schedule is packed with seasonal foliage of the photographic sort. 

Buying unhealthy treats.

Ann Romney prepared for trick-or-treating and sweater season at The Peanut Shop in Lansing, Michigan, Friday. She bought the seasonally appropriate snack of cinnamon almonds, her husband's favorite.

Eating snacks in the parents' basement rec room.

Just kidding, Romney was watching the vice-presidential debate on Thursday at the Grove Park Inn, a resort in Asheville, North Carolina, which looks quite grand from the outside but packed with bad plaid on the inside.

Fireside chats with grandpa

Romney met with the Rev. Billy Graham in Montreat, North Carolina, Thursday.

Hayrides

Romney campaigned amid hay bales in Van Meter, Iowa, on October 9.

Supermarket runs for treat-making

Paul Ryan bought spices to make venison sausage in Kenosha, Wisconsin, October 7.

Diet abandonment for caramel apple-eating

Ryan at the Apple Holler farm in Sturtevant, Wisconsin, on October 7.

Pumpkin acquisition

Ryan picked up some pumpkins at the Apple Holler pumpkin patch on October 7.

(Above photos via Associated Press.)

Touch football in the backyard

Just kidding, this is tackle. And it's not a backyard, it's the Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati, where the Reds were playing the San Francisco Giants in Game 3 of the National League Division Series playoffs on October 9. This guy ran onto the field with a Romney sign until cops caught him.

(Last two photos via Reuters.)

It's all so cozy. We're still waiting for leaf-peeping, however.

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