Advertising Industry Refocuses Efforts on Diversifying: In recognition of the lack of diversity in the advertising industry, the Advertising Club of New York will be using a $700,000 investment to promote training and retainment of diverse candidates, the New York Times reports.

Schools Prepare for Race to the Top: Close to 900 U.S. school districts will participate in the new Race to the Top competition, in which the Education Department plans to distribute $400 million in grants, USA Today reports. As part of a renewed effort to create nationwide education reform, the grants will go toward districts that implement new initiatives to help close achievement gaps and prepare students for their futures.

"Undocubus" Arrives in Charlotte: Dream activists have reached Charlotte, N.C., in anticipation of the Democratic National Convention after riding across the U.S. in support of immigrant rights, the Huffington Post reports. The "No Papers, No Fear Ride for Justice" is meant to draw attention to the tough immigration laws and the unfair treatment suffered by undocumented immigrants.

Why Arpaio Won't Be Criminally Charged: Federal authorities will not file criminal charges against Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio or his department, citing insufficient evidence from a non-specific investigation that would prove Arpaio or his department were at fault, the Arizona Republic reports. While his actions could be held accountable in civil court, there were no specific federal statutes that Arpaio violated, according to the Arizona Republic

Most New Jobs Pay Less: Although the job market has slowly improved, the majority of new job opportunities are now paying low wages, according to a new analysis reported on by the New York Times. Mid-level, mid-wage fields account for just 22 percent of total job growth while low-wage jobs account for 58 percent of job growth.

This article is part of our Next America: Communities project, which is supported by a grant from Emerson Collective.

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