The share of those living in diverse suburbs in the Seattle metropolitan area jumped 21 percent between 2000 and 2010.

The Puget Sound region also saw the emergence of predominantly nonwhite areas to the south of the city center where the poverty rate was higher and the median income lower than in other suburban areas.

In a decade, the population grew about 11 percent, to 3.4 million, according to the Seattle data summary (pdf).

This article is part of our Next America: Communities project, which is supported by a grant from Emerson Collective.

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