Predominantly white suburbs in the Oklahoma City metro region have dwindled in one decade to only 6 percent from 26 percent. In turn, that has made Edmond, Norman, and Midwest City more diverse. From 2000 to 2010, diverse suburbs grew to 32 percent from 12 percent.

The pockets that have remained majority white are scattered in the four corners surrounding Oklahoma City, with the largest cluster of predominantly white suburbs being in the Choctaw and Harrah regions.

Warr Acres and Bethany cities experienced some of the highest increases in the growth of nonwhites. For example, 23 percent of the population in Warr Acres was nonwhite in 2000; by 2010, the percentage was 39 percent, a 16-point increase.

In the course of the decade, the population growth for Oklahoma City, according to the report, grew to 1.25 million, a 14.6 percent increase.

This article is part of our Next America: Communities project, which is supported by a grant from Emerson Collective.

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