In Detroit, though the plurality of its communities are predominantly white suburbs, their total population shrunk considerably, declining from 65 percent of the metro area population in 2000 to just 49 percent  in 2010.

That's in stark contrast to the diverse suburbs in the region, where residents made up just 3 percent of the area's population in 2000 but soared to 23 percent in 2010.

Some of the largest diverse suburbs in the Detroit area include Warren, with a 2010 population of 134,056 people and a 23 percent nonwhite population; and Canton township, population 90,173 with a 30 percent nonwhite population. 

The summarizing Detroit report indicates a decline of about 5 percent in the region's population, to nearly 4.3 million people.

This article is part of our Next America: Communities project, which is supported by a grant from Emerson Collective.

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