The most striking change for the Dallas metropolitan area is the near-swap of predominantly white and nonwhite suburbs between 2000 and 2010. In 2000, predominantly white suburbs made up 14 percent of communities in the Dallas region; nonwhite suburbs made up just 1 percent. Ten years later, predominantly nonwhite suburbs grew to 13 percent of all communities, while white suburbs shrunk to just 5 percent.

The percentage of diverse suburban communities in the Dallas metropolitan region remains largely unchanged at 36 percent in both 2000 and 2010. In 2010, diverse and nonwhite suburbs took over much of the adjacent neighborhoods just outside of Dallas proper as the few predominantly white neighborhoods remained farther and farther from the central city.

The summarizing Dallas report indicates a 19 percent growth in the region's population to nearly 6.4 million people.

This article is part of our Next America: Communities project, which is supported by a grant from Emerson Collective.

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