Racial, Socioeconomic Segregation Still Rampant in Schools: Despite a younger generation that's becoming increasingly diverse, our nation's schools are still woefully segregated: White students remain  concentrated in schools with other whites while blacks and Latinos are often isolated in their own schools, according to a study as reported on by the New York Times. Black or Latino students are twice as likely as white or Asian students to attend schools where its majority are poor children, the study shows.

Black Male Graduation Rate Still Lags Behind Others: The majority of young black men who earned their high school diplomas did so in four years, a major improvement for this racial cohort yet their numbers still lagged behind their white counterparts, according to a report cited by USA Today. The report found that 52 percent of male black students graduated from high school in four years, compared to 58 percent of Hispanic males and 78 percent of white, non-Hispanics.

Arizona Begins to Enforce "Show Your Papers": Arizona police Wednesday began enforcing the controversial "show your papers" provision of the state's tough immigration law, which requires officers to ask for documentation proving legal status if they have reasonable suspicion, Reuters reports.

Voter Laws Fire Up Dems: Voter ID laws in states like Pennsylvania, Florida and Ohio have fired up Democratic activists who have ramped efforts to help citizens register to vote and ensure that they will be able to do so come November, National Journal reports. Voting rights advocates have criticized the laws saying they would only disenfranchise the young, elderly and minority voters.

This article is part of our Next America: Communities project, which is supported by a grant from Emerson Collective.

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