This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

A new national survey sponsored by the Sierra Club has found that Latino voters overwhelmingly believe in climate change, support clean energy innovation over fossil fuel investment, and support environmental regulation.

The findings echo other polling data that shows Latino voter priorities align with those of the Democratic Party on a wide range of issues, above and beyond the divisive issue of immigration. A poll released last month by Latino Decisions, for example, found that 70 percent of Latino voters said they would support President Obama, with 22 percent backing his presumptive Republican opponent Mitt Romney.

The Sierra Club survey, released on Wednesday in conjunction with the Hispanic advocacy group The National Council of La Raza, found that nearly 90 percent of Latino voters in the U.S. support government investment in clean, renewable energy like solar and wind, while just 11 percent of Latinos would prefer investment in fossil fuels like coal, oil, and gas. It also found that 77 percent of Latino voters believe that global climate change is occurring, while another 15 percent say that it will happen in the future.

The survey of 1,131 Latino registered voters across the country was conducted from June 14-26; the margin of error is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

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