This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

The Brookings Institution released a long-term study earlier this month that examined the effects of school vouchers on eventual college enrollment. The academics had their say, but what do educators — the ones who are interacting with students on a daily basis — and other education-policy advocates have to say about it? Here we share some reactions from Twitter.

Vouchers deserve a spot among the array of interventions available to education policy makers. There remains no magic bullet. #BIVouchers

— Bart Pogue (@BartPogue) August 23, 2012

We need to empower parents and students to have a diversity of choices in schools, classes, and teachers. #BIVouchers

— Nelson R (@nelsonri72) August 23, 2012

The vouchers don't just affect the psychology of the students, it also affects that of the parents (parental satisfaction) #BIVouchers

— Bobby Thompson (@SunshineAsAMan) August 23, 2012

Wonder how NYC vouchers differ from other prgrms? Vouchers didn't cover total cost of private school, so still cost to parents. #BIVouchers

— Mandy Zatynski (@MandyZatynski) August 23, 2012

@brookingsinst @brookingsed #BIVouchers In Ohio, most vouchers go to kids who never were in public system, yet public system pays. Fair?

— Stephen Dyer (@StephenODyer) August 23, 2012

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

This article is part of our Next America: Higher Education project, which is supported by grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Lumina Foundation.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.