FROM THE EDITOR
In towns of all sizes, on the streets, in churches and parks — not to mention increasingly on TV — you can hear many languages, particularly Spanish. This Next America special supplement to National Journal explores the role of English as lingua franca and raises many hard-to-answer questions about a dominant language in an increasingly diverse democracy. Read more »

Cover Story

The Ties That Bind


By Terry Greene Sterling

In Focus

Uplifting Languages


By Stephanie Czekalinski

ESSAY

Alienated America


By Michael Hirsh

STATE MATTERS

Utah: Multilingual Missionaries


By Terry Greene Sterling

Also:
INTERACTIVE: Mapping Languages
Get a by-the-numbers view of Limited English Proficiency across America's communities.

GALLERY: Language As America's Glue
Few people disagree that the English language and the "melting pot" culture is indicative of American identify. But the language wars that have escalated are telling a different story.

VIEWPOINT: Language Broadens Definition of 'American'
The coordinator of teacher support and professional development for the Anaheim Union High School District in California discusses what it means to be a third-generation Japanese-American.

PLUS! Online Exclusive:
Montgomery County, Md.: The Intersection of Diversity, Culture and Language
Maryland's existence as a border state between the north and south has provided a unique perspective. Montgomery County is at the forefront of the diversification of the U.S., boasting the largest English-learning program in the state and one of the most diverse student bodies in the entire nation.

SEE ALSO
Spring Supplement: Diversity Takes Root

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