America ranks 13th in the world in its share of women who are thriving, according to the results of a recent Gallup survey.

More than half — 55 percent — of American women surveyed said they were thriving; 57 percent of men said the same thing, according to the survey.

Out of 147 countries, 13th isn't bad. But that puts the U.S. beneath countries like Costa Rica (a woman became president in 2010); Brazil (a woman became president in 2011); and the United Arab Emirates, where women represent two-thirds of government-sector employees and 22 percent of the Federal National Council, the country's parliamentary body.

Women are most likely to be doing well in Denmark, where 78 percent reported thriving. Only 2 percent of Afghan women reported the same.

This article is part of our Next America: Communities project, which is supported by a grant from Emerson Collective.

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