This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

Although he's unlikely to make inroads with President Obama's strong hold on the African-American vote, Mitt Romney will address the 103rd NAACP annual convention in Houston this July.

The association asks presidential candidates to attend every four years, and in 2008, John McCain and Barack Obama addressed the convention. President Obama has not yet responded to an invitation to attend this year's conference, according to NAACP spokesman Ben Wrobel, though he did issue a video address to the conference in 2009.

"We are pleased that Governor Romney has decided to join us in Houston this summer. This election will be about how to provide the best future for all Americans, of every color and background," said NAACP President Benjamin Todd Jealous in a news release. Jealous added that convention-goers expect Romney to address "his vision for a more just society."

Romney's decision to address the conference may not be based on an attempt to win over black voters. Rather, he's likely looking to appeal to college-educated white women, a key voting bloc this November who consider themselves tolerant and are looking for a candidate who shares those values.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.