This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

CLARIFICATION: An earlier version of this article inaccurately described Cristinia Saralegui's profession.

The Obama campaign launched Spanish-language television ads on Tuesday, featuring the Hispanic television personality Cristina Saralegui.

In the ads, Saralegui focuses on the president's policies toward heath care and the economy. In a release, the campaign said the health care reform law made coverage available for nine million previously uninsured Americans.

The ads will air in NevadaColorado and Florida.

Saralegui taped ads in English and Spanish. 

On Monday, the campaign announced Saralegui's endorsement, coming just days after the president announced his administration's new immigration policy.

"This is a critical time for our country and for the Hispanic community," she said in a statement. "Hispanics could very well decide the next election and I will do everything I can from now until November to ensure that President Obama is reelected; there's simply too much at stake. President Obama, I was very fortunate to live the American dream and I know that only you will make it possible for millions more to do the same. You've had our back, and now, with utmost respect and admiration, I have yours."

Saralegui is not the first celebrity to make an ad supporting the president. Singer Marc Anthony taped ads in English and Spanish, encouraging Latinos to register to vote and participate in the campaign.

Obama's campaign has also made ads featuring Hispanic campaign workers.

Republican contender Mitt Romney's campaign has also launched Spanish-language ads, saying that Obama's economic policies have made it difficult for the Latino community.

Romney's son Craig, who is fluent in Spanish, narrates this ad titled "Nosotros," or "Us." In the ad, he says that America represents freedom and liberty and is a country where anything is possible and promises to return the country to former greatness.

Earlier in the campaign, the Romney camp released the two-part ad "Dia Uno," or "Day One," that outlines Romney's first day in office.

In the ad "Un Dia Mejor" ("A Better Day"), Romney promises to make changes he says will improve the economy and outlines how his presidency would change the country's economic prospects.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.