This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

Hispanic politicians expected to gain more seats in November elections; Report shows lung cancer deaths for women in the South and Midwest are on the rise; and more.

Hispanic Politicians Expected to Gain More Seats in November Elections

The growing population of Hispanics in the U.S. has also open gates for Latino hopefuls in politics, the Associated Press reports. State redistricting, which happens after decennial census data is taken, will build favor for Hispanic candidates in both California and Texas, with potential wins in New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada and Florida. Currently, there are 29 Hispanics in the House, a number that is expected to grow, the AP reports.

Read more here.

Report: Lung Cancer Deaths for Women in South, Midwest Are on the Rise

Deaths among women related to lung cancer are on the rise in the South and Midwest, despite declining rates nationwide, according to new research published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Lung cancer deaths among men and women have been declining since the 1990s in part because of aggressive anti-smoking campaigns, Reuters reports. But middle-aged women have been consistently steady or on the rise.

Read more here.

Opinion: High Court's Decision on Juvenile Sentences Will Benefit African-Americans

The Supreme Court's decision Monday that found mandatory life sentences without parole for juveniles convicted of homicide to be in violation of the Eighth Amendment is a significant win for criminal system reform, writes David A. Love. African-American and Latino juveniles are most likely to be found in the system, and by acknowledging the chance of rehabilitation for these teens, the system is giving them a new chance at life, Love argues.

Read more here.

NYC Program Builds "˜Sisterhood' for Young Girls in Tech

A New York initiative, "Girls Who Code," will train 20 teenagers in technology courses, from mobile application development to robotics. The group is part of an renewed effort to get more girls interested in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics field (STEM), an area that typically has a large gender gap between women and men.

Read more here.

Hispanic Politicians Expected to Gain More Seats in November Elections

The growing population of Hispanics in the U.S. has also open gates for Latino hopefuls in politics, the Associated Press reports. State redistricting, which happens after decennial census data is taken, will build favor for Hispanic candidates in both California and Texas, with potential wins in New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada and Florida. Currently, there are 29 Hispanics in the House, a number that is expected to grow, the AP reports.

Read more here.

Report: Lung Cancer Deaths for Women in South, Midwest Are on the Rise

Deaths among women related to lung cancer are on the rise in the South and Midwest, despite declining rates nationwide, according to new research published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Lung cancer deaths among men and women have been declining since the 1990s in part because of aggressive anti-smoking campaigns, Reuters reports. But middle-aged women have been consistently steady or on the rise.

Read more here.

Opinion: High Court's Decision on Juvenile Sentences Will Benefit African-Americans

The Supreme Court's decision Monday that found mandatory life sentences without parole for juveniles convicted of homicide to be in violation of the Eighth Amendment is a significant win for criminal system reform, writes David A. Love. African-American and Latino juveniles are most likely to be found in the system, and by acknowledging the chance of rehabilitation for these teens, the system is giving them a new chance at life, Love argues.

Read more here.

NYC Program Builds "˜Sisterhood' for Young Girls in Tech

A New York initiative, "Girls Who Code," will train 20 teenagers in technology courses, from mobile application development to robotics. The group is part of an renewed effort to get more girls interested in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics field (STEM), an area that typically has a large gender gap between women and men.

Read more here.

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

This article is part of our Next America: Communities project, which is supported by a grant from Emerson Collective.

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